Derrick Hall satisfied with Dbacks buying and se

first_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Last season, Ellington caught 39 passes for 371 yards and one touchdown. It was his performance, however, as a running back (652 yards and three touchdowns) that really opened everyone’s eyes, including Palmer’s.“He’s so explosive. He’s so quick. His vision is so good,” Palmer said. “And then you want to put him the pass game, too, because he’s so good in the pass game that it’s hard to kind of predict, ‘well, I hope he has x-amount of yards and x-amount of catches’ because he’s so talented in both. Selfishly, I want to use him in the pass game, but selfishly I want to use him in the run game, too, because that helps us all out, too.”None of what Ellington accomplished his rookie year surprised him — “I knew what I was capable of,” he said — yet he knows he has yet to arrive.“Every day I remind myself I’ve got to improve. I was a sixth-rounder,” he said. “Even though I’m starting this year, but that’s nothing. I’ve got to still get better.”Of course as Ellington’s play increases so too will the spotlight.“I just let my play speak louder than anything,” he said. “I just go out there and handle my business. As long as I’m taking care of that part of my game, I’ll be fine. I’ll get that attention. It’s all good to have that attention, but at the end of the day, if you don’t put in the work on the field, you won’t have it.” Top Stories Because of that success — he became only the fifth rookie in franchise history to surpass 1,000 yards from scrimmage — and the retirement of Rashard Mendenhall, Ellington enters his second NFL training camp as the No. 1 running back on the Arizona Cardinals’ roster.“I’m very confident,” he said, surrounded by reporters. “Last year, I wasn’t aware of what my role would be on the team. But now I’ve kind of got an idea so I’m going to approach this season a lot different than I did last year.”That began in the offseason when he added about eight to 10 pounds of muscle to his 5-foot-9, 199-pound frame.“I bulked up my upper body a little bit (more) than I was last year,” he said. “Not too much. I didn’t want to get slow. I had to keep my speed.”Then, there was the matter of learning all three wide receiver positions, something Ellington had never been asked to do during his four years at Clemson.“It was a little tough at first, but as the spring went on, I got used to it,” he said, adding he sought out advice from Larry Fitzgerald and others. “As long as I can get the ball in my hands, I’ll be fine. I enjoy (playing receiver). It helps a lot. It gets me in space and that’s kind of like how I want to play. I want to play in space and (then) I don’t have to take on those hits time-after-time so I’ll take (the ball) in space all day.” – / 32 0 Comments   Share   center_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo GLENDALE, Ariz. — Typically, the spotlight does not shine on a sixth-round draft pick. But Andre Ellington is no ordinary sixth-round talent.Head coach Bruce Arians has expressed a desire to get the ball in Ellington’s hands 25 to 30 times a game, while quarterback Carson Palmer continually raves about the 25-year-old’s talents, calling the success he had a year ago “pretty rare” for a player drafted 187th overall. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

The first 60 operational satellites for SpaceXs project Starlink are slated to

first_img The Future of Smart Homes Sponsored Content You May Like by Qingdao Haiercenter_img SpaceX to Launch Thousands of Satellites Into SpaceThanks to the FCC.ShareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseMuteCurrent Time 0:01/Duration 1:04Loaded: 15.63%0:01Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:03 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenElon Musk’s SpaceX has made a business out of launching satellites for commercial customers, NASA and the U.S. military.On Wednesday, the company will launch orbital objects of its own in a critical step toward creating a space-based constellation that beams broadband to underserved areas across the globe. It’s a bet Musk is making along with fellow billionaire Jeff Bezos on bringing in revenue as an internet provider from outer space. Musk founded SpaceX in 2002 intending to colonize Mars.The first 60 operational satellites for SpaceX’s project, called Starlink, are slated to launch aboard one of the company’s Falcon 9 rockets at around 10:30 p.m. local time Wednesday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. SpaceX said in a tweet late Tuesday from its Hawthorne, California headquarters that “weather is 80% favorable” for a launch on schedule. After the launch and payload deployment, SpaceX will attempt to land the Falcon 9’s first stage on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.Roughly one hour and two minutes after liftoff, the Starlink satellites will begin deploying at an altitude of about 273 miles (440 kilometers) above Earth, SpaceX said in a press kit, then use onboard propulsion to reach an operational altitude of 550 km. Each satellite is equipped with a navigation system that allows SpaceX to precisely position the satellites, track orbiting debris and avoid collisions.After sharing a teaser photo on Twitter of the satellites packed into the payload fairing of the rocket, Musk warned that “much will likely go wrong” on the first mission, and that six more launches of 60 satellites each will be needed to provide “minor” broadband coverage.About 4 billion people — the vast majority of whom are in Africa and Southeast Asia — aren’t online and lack affordable, reliable access to the internet. Even in the U.S., a quarter of Americans in rural areas say access to high-speed internet is a significant problem, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in 2018.“Starlink will afford broadband data access to the disconnected 4 billion much sooner than most would forecast,” Steve Jurvetson, a longtime SpaceX director, tweeted Sunday.The Federal Communications Commission initially authorized SpaceX to launch and operate a constellation of 4,425 non-geostationary orbit satellites in March of last year, then approved an additional 7,518 in November.SpaceX’s plan for roughly 12,000 satellites far exceeds the 1,957 satellites orbiting the Earth now, according to a tally by the Union of Concerned Scientists.Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive officer, first announced his satellite plans in 2015 when the company opened an engineering campus near Seattle. He said the system would cost $10 billion to $15 billion to create — maybe more — but that it would bring significant revenue to SpaceX once developed and ultimately help fund a city on Mars.“Looking in the long term, and saying what’s needed to create a city on Mars? Well, one thing’s for sure: a lot of money,” Musk said. “We need things that will generate a lot of money.”He’s far from alone in seeing dollar signs pushing a satellite-based internet service. Others with similar ambitions include Amazon.com Inc.’s Bezos, who runs rival rocket company Blue Origin LLC; Canada’s Telesat, and Virginia-based OneWeb, which has backing from SoftBank.SpaceX launched a pair of Starlink demonstration satellites in February of last year. Four months later, Musk flew to Seattle to visit the team leading the project and fired at least seven people within hours, Reuters reported, citing two unidentified employees. The dismissals followed disagreements between Musk and others over the pace at which the satellites were being developed and tested, the news service said in October.One of those ousted was Rajeev Badyal, who had joined SpaceX from Microsoft Corp. in 2014 and was vice president of satellites. Last month, CNBC reported that Badyal is now leading Amazon’s Project Kuiper, which plans to put more than 3,000 satellites in low Earth orbit.When the MIT Technology Review reported on Amazon’s project last month, Musk tweeted that Bezos was a copycat.“Each company has to launch a certain number of satellites to provide commercial services,” said Tom Stroup, president of the Satellite Industry Association in Washington. He noted there are already companies, including Iridium Communications Inc. and SES SA, that are currently providing broadband services from space.“Getting hundreds, or thousands, of satellites into space and operational is no small feat,” he said. HealthFormer GE CEO Jeff Immelt: To Combat Costs, CEOs Should Run Health Care Like a BusinessHealthFor Edie Falco, an ‘Attitude of Gratitude’ After Surviving Breast CancerLeadershipGhosn Back, Tesla Drop, Boeing Report: CEO Daily for April 4, 2019AutosElon Musk’s Plan to Boost Tesla Sales Is Dealt a SetbackMPWJoe Biden, Netflix Pregnancy Lawsuit, Lesley McSpadden: Broadsheet April 4last_img read more