Liverpool agree £10m Dempsey deal – report

first_imgFulham star Clint Dempsey is on the verge of completing a move to Liverpool after a £10m fee was agreed, according to the Daily Mail.It is claimed that Anfield boss Brendan Rodgers expects the deal to be completed within the next few days.Meanwhile, The Sun say Chelsea have had another bid for Victor Moses rejected by Wigan.Latics chairman Dave Whelan is said to have turned down a third offer from the Blues – believed to be £5m – for the former Crystal Palace forward.Whelan is quoted as saying: “They’ve made three bids and we’ve not accepted any. I don’t know if they’ll bid again but if they do we always listen.”The Guardian report that Chelsea are set to sign highly-rated Brazilian midfielder Oscar from Internacional for £25m.Related West London Sport story: Breakthrough for Chelsea in Oscar talksThe Daily Express suggest Chelsea will have further talks with Napoli striker Edinson Cavani’s agents over a £35m move, but the Uruguayan’s wage demands are apparently holding up the deal.The Mail say Tottenham boss Andre Villas-Boas is hoping to beat his former club Chelsea to the signing of Porto striker Hulk.QPR are willing to subsidise a loan move for Joey Barton, according to the Daily Mirror.It is suggested that Blackburn want the midfielder but cannot afford his wages, so Rangers would be prepared to continue paying a large percentage of his salary.Nottingham Forest and Sheffield Wednesday have also been linked with Barton, who is suspended for the first 12 matches of the coming season.This page is regularly updated. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Discussions Increase About Science and Religion

first_imgCary McMullen, writing for the Lakeland Ledger (Florida), has listed some recent developments indicating that more and more scientists and theologians are becoming interested in the relationship between science and religion.  His list spans a spectrum from atheistic opinions of Stephen Weinberg to neo-orthodox views of Fuller Seminary, with a variety of voices and views in between: the United Methodist Church, John Polkinghorne, the Templeton Foundation, bioethics, spirituality and health, Consilience, and the Intelligent Design movement, which McMullen calls “one of the more controversial approaches to science and religion.”  He also reviews the history of thought on science and religion, polls of scientists, and whether there is any overlap between the two domains.Few are the representatives on the list who regard the Word of God as authoritative.  Most of the opinions expressed are just that: opinions.  Liberal scholars and scientists have lots of opinions, but are there any, especially among those calling themselves Christians, willing to affirm that the Word of God is the final authority, even over science?  Without that anchor, the fogginess of talk about “spirituality” could leave people in the dark as much as any materialistic religion.    It is simplistic to treat science and religion as separate realms (this was Stephen Jay Gould’s final campaign), because the Bible, and most religions for that matter, deal with natural phenomena, and science frequently makes philosophical and religious assumptions about origins and destiny.  The battle in the 18th century was really not about natural selection or evolution specifically, but about whether philosophical naturalism had sole authority to explicate the creation myths of the culture.    For naturalism to usurp science, it had to invade the unseen past and future with imagination instead of observation.  The strategy that enabled Darwin’s defenders to take over a scientific enterprise that had largely been under theological dominion was to elevate naturalistic storytellers to the ranks of scientists.  This was illustrated in the contest between Richard Owen and Thomas Huxley in the 1860s.  Science used to be about proving things and demonstrating things.  One of Richard Owen’s first criticisms of Charles Darwin’s book was about this very point.  As a leading scientist in Britain in 1859 and a very religious man, Owen was not interested in what Charlie believed or thought had happened in the history of life, but what he could prove.  With the help of agenda-driven insurgents like Huxley, Lyell, Hooker and Asa Gray, (Janet Browne dubs them the “Four Musketeers”*), Charlie’s Just-So Storytelling Club gained the ascendancy, and science has been stuck supporting a welfare state ever since (12/22/2003).  Huxley, out of a personal anger at God for allowing the death of his son, was on a personal crusade to rid all science of consideration of God, and even startled Darwin with his brashness telling everyone, even working men, that they were evolved monkeys.  Huxley worked like a political revolutionary, not an impartial scientist.  He had an agenda.  He wanted empire: unsatisfied with natural phenomena that were testable, observable and repeatable, he worked fervently on a hostile takeover of the origins and destiny business.    Think beyond the collapse of the Darwinian regime, which appears inevitable.  Will it be replaced by something better?  Probably not, as long as humans refuse to acknowledge the authority of their Creator.  That’s been the basic human sin since Eden.  If the scientific just-so storytellers ever get shamed out of science, what we don’t need, any more than another brand of cigarettes, is another group of storytellers from the religious side.  Liberal theologians and spiritual leaders have lots of opinions, but who cares what they believe or think is true, if they cannot prove it?    This leads directly to the question, what is the source of ultimate authority?  We learned it is not Aristotle, but neither is it any other mortal, including a scientist.  If science returns to its empirical roots and gets out of the spheres of origins, destiny and ultimate meaning, that question may well prove to be the intellectual battle of the 21st century.  Unfortunately, Bible believers may find it more difficult to debate liberal theologians than materialistic scientists on this point.  At least materialistic scientists claimed to respect objective truth and logic.  But liberal theologians tend to become hypnotized on spirituality or their own imaginations rather submitting to the authority of the Word of God.  Getting them to prove their opinions, rather than tell religious just-so stories, will be like trying to nail jello to the wall.  Creationists might get nostalgic for the good old days.Suggested reading:  Jer. 9:23-24, Rom. 3:4, and I Cor. 1:18-2:16.*Janet Browne, Charles Darwin: The Power of Place (Princeton, 2002, ch. 4).(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South African brand remains consistent

first_img20 November 2015Brand South Africa, in partnership with Independent Media’s Business Report, released South Africa’s Nation Brand Index results at the Regency Hyatt hotel in Rosebank, Johannesburg this week.Brand South Africa general manager for research Dr Petrus de Kock presented the details of the index’s findings. He also joined a panel discussion with media monitoring professional Tonya Khoury, economics expert Dr Iraj Abedian and Sello Mosai, executive manager of Productivity SA, to discuss the intricacies of the results and the way forward for the country and its brand.#SABrandIndex panel @productivitysa Sello Mosai @IrajAbedian @brand_sa Dr Petrus de Kock @ROIAfrica @TonyaROI pic.twitter.com/rn6OyCV2PH— Brand South Africa (@Brand_SA) November 18, 2015Abedian is the founder and chief executive of Pan-African Capital Holdings, as well as a highly respected economic policy adviser, researcher and author. Khoury is a leading expert on South African and African media analysis and the founder of ROI Africa media monitoring company.#SABrandIndex @Brand_SA CEO Kingsley Makhubela welcomes guests, speakers to the event. pic.twitter.com/d8CzAtjwGL— Brand South Africa (@Brand_SA) November 18, 2015The event was opened by Brand South Africa chief executive, ambassador Kingsley Makhubela, who spoke about the changing dynamics of global geopolitics. He cited the Paris attacks and the Syrian crisis to illustrate how perceptions could affect the way the rest of the world saw individual countries. He urged that South Africa, as a nation, use the findings of the index, as well other global economic and social barometers, to look at what other nations were doing right and change the things the country was doing incorrectly.South Africans could be proud of the country’s performance in a range of indices in the past year, Makhubela said. “The Global Competitiveness Index produced by the World Economic Forum ranks us 49 amongst 140 countries and number two in Africa. (together with) the Mo Ibrahim Index on African Governance placing us at number four amongst 54 countries on the continent. now, the Nation Brand Index places us at number 38 of 50 countries.”#SABrandIndex Introduction by Sello Mosai @productivitysa pic.twitter.com/I8b6510rBI— Brand South Africa (@Brand_SA) November 18, 2015The country needed to embrace a culture of continuous improvement and be able to tangibly measure those improvements through surveys such as the Nation Brand Index in order to become a better country, Productivity SA’s Mosai said in his introduction to De KockThe Nation Brand IndexThe Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index is a global survey, started in 2008 by British policy researcher Simon Anholt, the “father” of nation branding.The index measures perceptions and opinions of 50 country-brands, including 20 core countries and 30 economically and regionally representative member countries, based on the six dimensions of national competence, known as the Nation Brand Hexagon. These include governance, exports, tourism, people and culture, as well as investment and immigration. An overall score is determined from the average of the six scores.Anholt called the index a vital barometer for how countries perceived each other and how it affected relationships with one another. In an overview of the survey on its website, he explained that “it is (a country’s) perceived impact on the world that affects reputation more than assets or achievements”.The dimensions of the nation brand hexagonExports: This is what marketers call the country of origin effect – whether knowing where the product is made increases or decreases people’s likelihood of buying it, based on a country’s particular strengths in science and technology, as well as creative energy.Governance: This dimension incorporates the perceived competency and honesty of the government, while also taking into account perceptions on how the government respects citizens’ rights. A country’s global behaviour in international peace and security, its environmental protection policies and efforts to reduce poverty are also factors.Culture: The score is based on perceptions of a country’s heritage and its contemporary culture of music, art and sport. The survey gauges the strongest images and recollections of a country’s cultural product.People: Assessment of the sociability of a country’s citizens and the appeal of the people on both personal and professional levels (tourism and business relationships).Tourism: The appeal of a country is scored based on three major areas: natural beauty, historical significance, urban modernity.Immigration and investment: This assesses the perceptions of a country’s economic prosperity, equal opportunity and quality of life – would it be somewhere you would want to live and/or invest in?The scores of each dimension, as well as the overall score, are based on an online survey of over 20 000 interviewees from 20 countries. Scores are determined from a combination of ratings and word choice surveys completed by the sample. Fieldwork was conducted from 9 to 27 July 2015.This year, the United States gained the top spot on the survey overall, while Germany, which was first in 2014, was second. The United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, Italy, Switzerland, Australia and Sweden completed the top 10.South Africa’s brand index rating#SABrandIndex 2015 ratings. #NationBrandIndex pic.twitter.com/zrs9NbWlyN— Brand South Africa (@Brand_SA) November 18, 2015South Africa’s brand index rating per dimension is:Exports: 36th out of 50 countries surveyedGovernance: 39thCulture: 30thPeople: 36thTourism: 36thImmigration and investment: 39thSouth Africa’s overall rating this year is 38th, a one place drop over 2014. But it remained consistent in the fields of exports and governance. The country raised its rating by one place in people and tourism, with both moving to 36th place out of the 50 countries surveyed.According to a summary of the results, the Anholt website highlighted South Africa’s slow but steady climb in the survey over the years. “South Africa’s growing international appeal gives it a measure of moral authority,” it said. “Developing South Africa’s reputation should leverage off existing positive profile the country has globally.”As has been consistent throughout South Africa’s participation in the survey, the country’s strengths still lie in its natural beauty, highly influential artistic and sport culture, and its diligent and skilful people in the business field.South African cultural touchstones were getting a lot more exposure overseas, Khoury noted later during the panel discussion. She cited issues such as the discovery of Homo Naledi and the success of Trevor Noah. This, she said, was in most part the result of the continuing rise of social media and the proliferation of news cycles, which also had a negative side, as seen in the case of Oscar Pistorius’ murder trial during 2014 and 2015.“The nature of social media is that people have a voice and an opinion, but sometimes don’t know how strong that voice can be and don’t consider the ramifications of using social media to express that voice,” Khoury explained.This year, the index noted that the South African respondents were generally more favourable towards their home country, ranking it sixth or better for the people, tourism and culture pillars.More work needs to be done in the country’s governance and poverty alleviation, as well as in raising the profile of its exports. The results also noted that improvements in the country’s technological readiness could raise its brand index in the future.Realistic optimism, based on figures and facts such as the ones found in the Nation Brand Index, were key to unlocking a more successful economy, Abedian said in the panel discussion. “Our economy is one of the most favourable economies; we just need to unlock it in the right way.”Mosai agreed, explaining that the potential of the South African economy was there. “We just have to maximise it correctly, using the right tools and information.”@brand_sa ‘s GM: Research Dr Petrus de Kock presents the 2015 #SABrandIndex results pic.twitter.com/FSY5LlSA5T— Brand South Africa (@Brand_SA) November 18, 2015So how can South Africa play to its strengths to improve on the weaknesses of the country as a brand?The panel discussion offered a variety of choice words and some typically South African out-of-the-box thinking to define and solve the conundrum.Khoury said South Africans were celebrated for doing things differently. She spoke of how the grassroots campaign #FeesMustFall used social media to put forward its ideas and build a following. At the same time, it communicated the campaign to the rest of the world, inspiring similar questioning of the issues globally. This, she said, was an organic and fluid process, something that could be applied to any kind of campaign with the right intentions.Abedian spoke about the differences between policy frameworks and the state’s stance, and finding a common ground to make the country’s economy work. He also said that the private sector, while remaining strong in South Africa, needed to play a more proactive role in highlighting its important role in South African society.Mosai said building a quintessential South African identity was something that should have been created from the beginning of the post-democratic era, yet it was not too late to start. “The identity of South Africa is every individual in the country and we have to build a united front out of all those elements,” he explained.De Kock argued that while 21 years may not be enough to form a definitive South African identity, he agreed that more in-depth interrogation of what we wanted as a nation was needed.In closing, all the panellists agreed that the country’s best course of action was to play to its strengths, while also changing perspective and being more creative thinkers. Mosai concluded that the country might have a trust deficient, politically, socially, globally: “If we can’t trust each other then we can’t work together. We need to find a common ground for all in the country.”“Our diversity is still our greatest strength,” concluded Abedian. “Let’s see how we can use that to feed positively into a national narrative in order to build on past failures and improve our successes.”last_img read more

Cebu City gov’t rallies behind embattled marathoner Tabal

first_imgMary Joy Tabal. FILE Photo from Cebu Daily NewsCEBU CITY—Should Cebuano marathon sensation Mary Joy Tabal be allowed to join in the Southeast Asian (SEA) Games, the Cebu City government will make sure that she will get the training that she needs for the competition. Cebu City Mayor Tomas Osmeña made an offer for the city to help fund Tabal’s trainings when she visited city hall on Tuesday morning during a courtesy call.She was accompanied by Commissioner Ramon Fernandez of the Philippine Sports Commission, among others.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds View comments LATEST STORIES Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Gabuya delivered a privilege speech during the session of the city council on Tuesday afternoon to ask the Philippine Athletics Track and Field Association (Patafa) to explain why Tabal was excluded from the roster of Filipino athletes who would compete in the SEA Games where the Cebuana won silver in 2015.READ: Tabal no longer part of national teamBecause of Gabuya’s speech, the council passed a resolution asking Patafa to include Tabal, the only Filipino to compete in last Olympics marathon, in the lineup.ADVERTISEMENT BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Olympian Ryan Lochte says he thought about suicide after Rio fiasco Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games The city is just waiting for Tabal to make a formal budget request that will include a breakdown of her training needs and costs, said Councilor Jerry Guardo, head of the council’s sports committee.He added the mayor also made a commitment to “fight” for Tabal’s inclusion in the SEA Games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCouncilor Eugenio Gabuya, deputy mayor for sports, said the budget for Tabal’s training can be charged to the mayor’s discretionary fund or Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corp. funds whichever is available.“As to how much (funding is needed) that is still to be determined,” he added. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more