Railways not to give money to CWG OC, but to Sports Ministry

first_imgWith the Commonwealth Games Organising Committee being mired in corruption allegations, the Railways has decided against giving it sponsorship worth Rs 100 crore and instead allocate it to the Sports Ministry.”We will give it (sponsorship money) to the Sports and Youth Affairs Ministry and it is upto them to carry forward,” Railway Minister Mamata Banerjee told reporters in New Delhi.The Railways, lead partner of the Commonwealth Games, had committed Rs 100 crore as sponsorship money. However, after allegations of corruption were levelled against top officials of the Games Organising Committee, the Railways withheld the amount.”The issue has been resolved now and the MoU will be signed shortly,” said a senior Railway Ministry official.However, the official clarified that the sponsorship money of Rs 100 crore will not be entirely cash.While railways have already launched a Commonwealth Games train showcasing the Games, it is planning to run special trains to Agra and Jaipur and other places for visitors during the Games.Besides railways have also launched a special logo for the Games which is being used in all Games related events.”So launching of these trains will also be taken into account as part of the sponsorhsip amount,” said the official.last_img read more

Bursitis of the heel

first_imgDefinitionBursitis of the heel is swelling of the fluid-filled sac (bursa) at the back of the heel bone under the Achilles tendon.Alternative NamesInsertional heel pain; Retrocalcaneal bursitisCauses, incidence, and risk factorsA bursa acts as a cushion and lubricant between tendons or muscles sliding over bone. There are bursas around most large joints in the body, including the ankle.The retrocalcaneal bursa is located in the back of the ankle by the heel. It is where the large Achilles tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel bone.Repeated or too much use of the ankle can cause this bursa to become irritated and inflamed. Possible causes are too much walking, running, or jumping.This condition is usually linked to Achilles tendinitis. Sometimes retrocalcaneal bursitis may be mistaken for Achilles tendinitis.Risks for this condition include starting an aggressive workout schedule, or suddenly increasing activity level without the right conditioning.SymptomsPain in the heel, especially with walking, running, or when the area is touchedPain may get worse when rising on the toes (standing on tiptoes)Red, warm skin over the back of the heelSigns and testsYour health care provider will take a history to find out if you have symptoms of retrocalcaneal bursitis. Examining your ankle can find the location of the pain. The physician will look for tenderness and redness in the back of the heel.The pain may be worse when the doctor bends the ankle upward (dorsiflex). Or, the pain may be worse when you rise on your toes.advertisementYou will not usually need imaging studies such as x-ray and MRI at first. If the first treatment does not improve the symptoms, your health care provider may recommend these tests. MRI may show inflammation.TreatmentYour health care provider may recommend the following treatments:Avoid activities that cause pain.Ice the heel several times a day.Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (for example, ibuprofen).Try over-the-counter or custom heel wedges to help decrease the stress on the heel.Try ultrasound treatment during physical therapy to reduce inflammation.Use physical therapy to improve flexibility and strength around the ankle, which can help the bursitis improve and prevent it from coming back.If these treatments dont work, your health care provider may inject a small amount of steroids into the bursa. After the inection, you should avoid stretching the tendon too much because it can break open (rupture).If the condition is connected with Achilles tendinitis, casting the ankle for several weeks to keep it from moving can be effective. Very rarely, surgery may be needed to remove the inflamed bursa.Expectations (prognosis)This condition usually gets better in several weeks with the proper treatment.Calling your health care providerIf you have heel pain or symptoms of retrocalcaneal bursitis that do not improve with rest, contact your health care provider for evaluation and treatment.PreventionMaintain proper form when exercising, as well as good flexibility and strength around the ankle to help prevent this condition.Proper stretching of the Achilles tendon helps prevent injury.ReferencesWapner KL, Parekh SG. Heel pain. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr., Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drezs Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2009:section F.Aranow MS. Posterior heel pain (retrocalcaneal bursitis, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy). Clin Podiatr Med Surg. 2005;22:19-43.Review Date:8/11/2012Reviewed By:David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., and C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.last_img read more

Duchess Of Cambridge Announced As Charity Patron

first_img“The Duchess’ support will help Place2Be hugely in its efforts to shine the spotlight on child mental health, and on the need to tackle these issues at the earliest possible stage, so that children have the brightest possible futures, as they deserve.

“By helping to raise awareness of Place2Be’s early intervention work in schools, The Duchess will also help the charity to reach even more of the UK’s most vulnerable children and their families who so desperately need support.”The Duchess also announced she is to be patron of SportsAid. SportsAid helps talented British athletes from the age of 12 who compete in more than 70 sporting disciplines, the majority of which are contested at the Olympic and Paralympic Games. These athletes are nominated to the charity by their sports’ governing bodies based on their performance, commitment and potential. Around 1,500 of them receive a SportsAid Award – which is typically £1,000 per athlete – each year. Past recipients include Sir Bradley Wiggins, Ellie Simmonds OBE, Tom Daley, Baroness Grey-Thompson, Jessica Ennis CBE, David Weir CBE and Rebecca Adlington OBE.Tim Lawler, the charity’s chief executive said, “This is fantastic news for young sports people throughout the UK and especially for those who hope one day to represent the country at the highest level of their sport.“I can think of no greater endorsement of SportsAid than for me to be able to welcome Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge as the charity’s patron. As a champion of future champions she will make a big difference to young athletes, helping them to tell their inspirational stories and maintain the support they need.”SportsAid alumnus Sir Chris Hoy said, “SportsAid played an important role when I was starting out so I know what a huge boost this will be to the young sportsmen and women the charity helps today. As patron Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge will give them the profile they deserve.”SportsAid alumna Rebecca Adlington OBE added, “This is just brilliant news! What a fantastic boost to SportsAid’s work with our next generation of talent. It will certainly help to maintain a living legacy from London 2012.” The Duchess of Cambridge has announced that she has become patron for several more charities.Place2Be is proud to announce that Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge has become Royal Patron of Place2Be.The Duchess’ decision to support Place2Be is a reflection of her personal interest in and commitment to improving the mental health and emotional wellbeing of children in the UK.

Benita Refson OBE, Chief Executive and Founding Trustee, said: “Place2Be is hugely honoured that The Duchess of Cambridge has chosen to become our Royal Patron.

“This is a tremendous endorsement of the tireless work and commitment of our staff, volunteer counsellors and supporters, as well as of the partner schools with whom we work to help troubled children to overcome emotionally difficult times in their lives.last_img read more