New growth path to create jobs: Patel

first_imgSource: BuaNews The South African government has identified several sectors with the potential to create new jobs as the country embarks on a shift to a more labour-absorptive economy, says Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel. The recession took a heavy toll on South Africa’s economy, with some 870 000 people losing their jobs in 2009 and households suffering from falling incomes and high levels of debt. The domestic economy contracted by an estimated 1.8% in 2009 as a result of a decline in consumption spending and weak investment growth. Discussions had been held with companies, industry associations and organised labour on matters such as the exchange rate, industrial policy and trade policy. He added that the new growth path, aimed at stepping up the fight against poverty and unemployment in South Africa, would recognise the crucial role of the private sector in creating new jobs. Advisory panel 24 March 2010 Delivering his department’s budget vote in Parliament in Cape Town on Tuesday, Patel said the new growth path would include a focus on manufacturing, infrastructure development, rural development and agro-processing, and the “green” economy. Patel said recovering the jobs lost in 2009 would require a major improvement in the employment performance of the economy, with a focus on decent work opportunities and “better social outcomes”.center_img Patel said an important policy focus for his department would be the creation of sustainable livelihoods and addressing the challenge of enterprises in the informal or “second economy”, adding that the government would also be looking at ways to improve the performance and impact of public institutions that were vital to economic development. “We call this the development of a new growth path,” he said. “The central ideas in the developmental growth path are to enhance the labour absorbing capacity of the economy … and to find ways to connect knowledge and innovation to the challenge of jobs and growth,” Patel said. “What started as a financial crisis rapidly spread to the real economy and impacted on jobs,” Patel said. “Real GDP fell by 1.8% in 2009 but is expected to start growing to 2.3% this year, rising to 3.6% in 2011.” While South Africa’s economy had started to show signs of recovery, Patel conceded that regulatory reforms that encouraged employment were needed. Patel further announced the formation of a special ministerial advisory panel, which he said will serve as an ideas forum. “I am pleased to announce that we have made good progress in establishing the panel since my announcement of the idea some two weeks ago here in Parliament.” Reforms to encourage employmentlast_img read more

Why Uber, Not HP, Is The Future Of Technology

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair While HP’s bleak outlook gets the biggest headline, up in the far right is a reminder of just how well the new breed of “technology vendors” is doing. Uber, chasing a potential venture capital round of $500 million and a valuation of $12 billion, isn’t a technology company, though its legal name is Uber Technologies Inc. It provides a service that matches available drivers to people in need of a ride. Yes, that service depends upon Node.js, Python and a range of other open-source software, but few would classify Uber as a technology company, at least not one in the same vein as an HP or SAP.After all, Uber doesn’t sell technology. It sells a technology-based service.The same is true of many other companies that depend heavily on technology but aren’t “technology companies,” per se. Google (advertising), Facebook (social networking), Amazon (um, everything), Netflix (entertainment) and many others all point to a trend captured three years ago by Marc Andreessen: Software is eating the world.As Andreessen wrote: More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.Over time, it is likely that Uber will get bigger headlines than HP as technology-fueled services become the norm for an industry that has depended for too long on cumbersome licensing strategies and expensive maintenance contracts.Does Software Stand A Chance?Are software companies doomed? Mostly, yes. While large enterprises persist in wanting to install and run software in data centers behind their firewalls, approximately none of them love the current enterprise sales model that has them dickering over massive discounts on overpriced license and maintenance contracts.So a new breed of software vendor is rising.While more software will move to a software-as-a-service model, both on the infrastructure (Amazon Web Services) and application (Salesforce.com) side, there will also remain companies like Red Hat. Red Hat now makes more than $1 billion each year selling services around Linux, JBoss middleware and more. Red Hat doesn’t sell software. It never has. Instead Red Hat gives away its software—all of it—under an open-source license. It makes money by selling an update service (Red Hat Network) that keeps the software patched and production ready, as well as support and ongoing certification of a host of third-party software that runs on or with its software. In the wake of the Big Data movement, we’re seeing vendors like Cloudera and Hortonworks achieve serious scale, growing up to challenge their more traditional peers.But even they aren’t the biggest winners.Every Company A Technology CompanyUltimately, as Cowen & Co. analyst Peter Goldmacher posits, the greatest financial beneficiaries of software aren’t those selling software at all, or even those selling SaaS offerings based on underlying open-source components. At least in the Big Data world, he argues, the biggest winners are those companies that have the necessary technical talent to use software to channel the value of data. At Uber, this means doing “crazy math and science” to connect drivers with riders and establish estimated pick-up times. At old-school retailer Sears, it means leveraging new-school Hadoop to deliver personalized coupons and other marketing collateral to drive sales. And for your company it will undoubtedly involve other foundational technologies, much of it open source for reasons expressed by Zohar Melamed in his Open Business Conference keynote earlier this month: Related Posts Tags:#Big Data#Credit Suisse#enterprise software#HP#Marc Andreessen#Open Source#Peter Cowen#Uber Matt Asay Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…center_img It hasn’t been a good week for HP. On the back of lower-than-expected earnings, the tech titan also announced it would cut between 11,000 and 16,000 employees. Sadly, HP is in good (or bad, if you wish) company. Oracle has missed estimates more often than it has hit them the past few years, most recently missing third-quarter earnings. IBM, for its part, hit earnings but missed its revenue targets. Again.Clearly, the legacy IT vendors are struggling. But just as clearly, technological innovation is not. It’s just being developed and deployed in ways that challenge the very foundation of yesterday’s technology businesses.Today’s Software Isn’t Licensed—It’s DrivenTo get a sense for what I’m talking about, take a look at a recent edition of The Wall Street Journal: None of this bodes well for the technology incumbents, of course, but it bodes very well for the future of the software industry. It will become increasingly difficult to categorize and far more potent. That’s a trade-off worth making.Lead image by Flickr user Ken Funakoshi, CC 2.0 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

Affleck, Garner celebrate Easter together after filing divorce

first_imgLos Angeles, Apr 17 (PTI) Hollywood stars Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner stepped out together to celebrate Easter just three days after filing for divorce.The former couple was photographed leaving a LA church service for the holiday, which they attended with their three children, Violet, 11, Seraphina, eight, and Samuel, five, reported E! Online.Garner, 45, opted for a blue sundress for the occassion, while Affleck, 44, donned similar hues, sporting a bluish-grey jacket with jeans and a white and blue shirt.The duo filed the documents together nearly two years after they originally announced their split.The two are seeking joint legal and physical custody of their kids.The date of separation, as well as the division of property and spousal support, is still to be determined. PTI SSN JCHlast_img read more