Amber Fort’s Maotha lake to get a new lease of life

first_imgThe charm of the Maotha lake situated outside the historic Amber Fort, near here, will be restored with its replenishment with water supplied from Banas river’s Bisalpur dam. The lake, which collects rain water flowing down from the nearby hills, has at present very little water after it remained dried-up for several months.The picturesque lake, which has the “Kesar Kyari” garden in its middle, was the main source of water for the Amber Palace and common people before the erstwhile royal capital was shifted to the newly-built Jaipur city in 18th century.The Water Resources Department’s plan to fill up the lake artificially will improve the ground water recharge, help in the supply of drinking water to the residents of Amber town and provide water to wild animals in the region. This is the second such exercise being undertaken after 2012 to revive traditional water sources and restore environmental balance.Public Health Engineering Department’s Principal Secretary Sandeep Verma said here on Tuesday that the Bisalpur dam in Tonk district, which was full to the brim after an increase in water inflow from its catchment areas during monsoon, was the “natural choice” as source of water for Maotha lake. The dam is currently supplying water to Jaipur, Tonk and Ajmer towns.Mr. Verma said the Maotha lake’s capacity was 300 million litres, which was equivalent to one day’s water supply from Bisalpur to Jaipur. “The water body’s replenishment will increase the water table of local sources by about 5 metres, which will give a major relief to the town’s residents,” he said.‘No adverse impact’ Mr. Verma said there was no possibility of adverse impact by the supply of water to Maotha lake on the availability of drinking water in Jaipur and other towns, for which the Bisalpur dam had emerged as a lifeline during the last decade.last_img read more

Venezuela players promote football at grassroots

first_imgWhile the spotlight is on Argentina and specifically Lionel Messi, one can’t forget that it takes two teams to play a football match.While everyone is talking about the Argentine team from the moment they landed at the Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport, the Venezuela outfit has been carrying on with their duties slowly but steadily.The Venezuelan players have decided to go ahead and promote the development of the game at the grassroots in the country.With Real Madrid opening their first football academy in Asia in Kheada – a village in West Bengal – to tap raw talent in rural areas, the Venezuela players have decided to go and spend time with the kids there and share their experiences with them.This sounds like exciting times for the kids as they are set to meet Real Madrid coach Jose Mourinho and star players like Iker Casillas in December for an interactive session.For the record, Venezuela had a terrific run in the recent Copa America and made it to the semi- finals before losing to Paraguay in a penalty shootout.With their domestic league turning professional only in 1957 and them getting international exposure only since 1967, it is no mean feat that 17 of the 23 players who have been selected for the match ply their trade in Europe.They might have not made the cut for the 2010 World Cup, but they can surely teach Indian youngsters a thing or two about how to go about chasing one’s dream to become a successful professional footballer.advertisementSujit Brahmachary, director of Institute for Indian Mother and Child (IIMC), said that Venezuela’s initiative to come forward and help was overwhelming.”The Real Foundation has already done a lot for the youngsters and now with Venezuela players keen to spend time with the kids, we are extremely pleased.”The aim has been to ensure that the youngsters in rural areas get to play the global game and if they get to meet international quality players and learn from them, what could be better. We are keenly looking forward to the meeting and interactive sessions,” he told MAIL TODAY.The foundation also plans to set up logistical facilities and has already signed a three-year contract with IIMC. It hopes the project will be as successful as the Tata Football Academy.last_img read more

Methyl salicylate overdose

first_imgDefinitionMethyl salicylate is a wintergreen-scented chemical found in many over-the-counter products, including muscle ache creams. Methyl salicylate overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally takes more than the normal or recommended amount of a product containing this substance.This is for information only and not for use in the treatment or management of an actual poison exposure. If you have an exposure, you should call your local emergency number (such as 911) or the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.See also: Sports cream overdoseAlternative NamesDeep heating rubs overdose; Oil of wintergreen overdosePoisonous IngredientMethyl salicylate, a compound similar to aspirinWhere FoundDeep-heating creams (Ben Gay, Icy Hot) used to relieve sore muscles and jointsOil of wintergreenSolutions for vaporizersNote: This list may not include all products that contain methyl salicylate.SymptomsBladder and kidneys:Kidney failureEyes, ears, nose, and throat:Eye irritationLoss of visionRinging in the earsThroat swellingHeart and blood:CollapseLow blood pressureLungs and airways:Difficulty breathingNo breathingRapid breathingNervous system:AgitationComa (decreased level of consciousness and lack of responsiveness)ConfusionConvulsionsDeafnessDizzinessDrowsinessHallucinationsHeadacheFeverSeizuresStomach and intestines:NauseaVomiting, possibly bloodyHome CareSeek immediate medical help. Do NOT make a person throw up unless told to do so by Poison Control or a health care professional.Before Calling EmergencyDetermine the following information:Patients age, weight, and conditionName of the product (ingredients and strengths, if known)Time it was swallowedAmount swallowedPoison Control, or a Local Emergency NumberThe National Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) can be called from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.advertisementThis is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.Take the container with you to the hospital, if possible.See: Poison control center – emergency numberWhat to Expect at the Emergency RoomThe health care provider will measure and monitor your vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Symptoms will be treated as appropriate. You may receive:Activated charcoalBreathing support, including tube through the mouth and breathing machine (ventilator)Chest x-rayEKG (heart tracing)Fluids through a vein (by IV)Kidney dialysis (machine)LaxativeMedicine (sodium bicarbonate) to reverse the effect of the medicationTube from the mouth into the stomach to empty the stomach (gastric lavage)Outlook (Prognosis)How well you do depends on how much salicylate is in the blood and how quickly treatment is received. The faster you get medical help, the better the chance is for recovery.Most people can recover if the effect of the salicylate can be stopped (neutralized).Internal bleeding is possible, and blood transfusion may be needed. Endoscopy, or passing a tube through the mouth into the stomach, may be required to stop internal bleedingMethyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) is the most poisonous (toxic) form of the salicylates.ReferencesTintinalli JE, Kelen GD, Stapczynski JS, Ma OJ, Cline DM. Salicylates. In: Tintinalli JE, Kelen GD, Stapczynski JS, Ma OJ, Cline DM, eds. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 6th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2004:chap 170.Kerr F, Krenzelok EP. Salicylates. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchesters Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 48.Seger DL, Murray L. Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosens Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 149.Review Date:1/20/2014Reviewed By:Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more