Ulster eye up Heineken Cup Quarter Final place

first_img“That said, we have a proud home record in the Heineken Cup over last two seasons, winning our last seven tournament matches at Ravenhill, and I am sure we will give Biarritz a warm Belfast welcome.“We know what we have to try and do, which is to get the win we need and go to Aironi to play for a quarter-final place.”Last season Ulster broke their English “duck” when they won on English soil for the first time, beating Bath Rugby 28-10, and they have now doubled that overall tally against the same opponents.Both contests against the former fellow Heineken Cup champions ended in four-point wins for the Irish team to go alongside a 30-6 opening round victory over Aironi.“That debut win in England against Bath last season – when we also beat them home and away in the Pool stages – gave us the confidence to go back there this year knowing what we are capable of achieving,” said McLaughlin.“As far as the defeat in Biarritz goes, obviously we were not happy with the end result but we did have opportunities in the first half but we did not put points on board. Then in the second half we made a few errors that Biarritz pounced upon and all credit to them for the win and the way they took those chances. Adrew Trimble will be facing Biarritz this weekend Ulster Rugby have been absent from the Heineken Cup knock-out stages ever since their day of glory in the spotlight when they lifted European club rugby’s most coveted prize in Dublin back in 1999 with a 21-6 demolition of Colomiers.For the last 11 tournaments they have failed to get past the Pool stages but now they are in with a real chance of ending that run as they face a potential make-or-break Pool 4 showdown with group leaders Biarritz Olympique at Ravenhill on Saturday.The French club, beaten Heineken Cup finalists both seven months ago and in 2006, top the Pool with a three-point buffer over Ulster but have already slipped up once on the road this season when they went down 28-27 at tournament newcomers Aironi Rugby.“Getting to the Heineken Cup quarter-finals has been one of our prime objectives for the season – it is most certainly where we want to be,” said head coach Brian McLaughlin.“From an Ulster Rugby perspective the match against Biarritz is an extremely important game because with the way the group has gone we have it all to play for – there are two games left and they are two games we must win.“However, Biarritz are an extremely strong side, they have a great pedigree in the Heineken Cup, they were last season’s finalists and have openly stated they want to win this tournament.“In players like Imanol Harinordoquy, Dimitri Yachvili and Damien Traille they have some smashing individuals and we are under no illusions that we are in for an extremely tough game.“Biarritz are a top quality side, no doubt about that, and although they had a little hiccup when they lost at Aironi, they will come here looking for the win – I believe it is going to be a smashing game. TAGS: Ulster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “However, our Heineken Cup destiny is in our own hands and although we know we are still an improving and emerging side, we know we are not there yet and that we have plenty of work to do.“We are not as consistent as we would like but we feel we are in the process of getting where we want to be and with the type of rugby we want to play.”last_img read more

Meet the one club Man – Louis Deacon

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. Deacon’s job both with Leicester and England is not to gallop into open field or make the killer pass that might come from a player like Lawes, but to do the hard, unseen graft that every rugby team needs. Every successful England side has had at least one heavy tractor in the engine room and Deacon is now fulfilling that role.“Courtney and I complement each other very well. We’re very different players, who do different jobs, but you need that in a team,” Deacon says. “It’s always been one of my goals to be involved in a World Cup. In 2007 I got down to the last few players before being cut and I was massively disappointed. Things moved on and my international career stuttered a little because of my injuries.“It’s great to know that the England coaches believe I can do a job for my country now. With the Leicester connection they’re probably in the best place to judge me. I played most of the 2010 Six Nations carrying injuries and it wears you down. Now I feel the best I have done for a long time.”That state of body and mind has stood him in good stead. And with more chances in an England shirt to come, perhaps everyone will start to hold him in the same regard as Johnson – like Deacon, the personification of a one-club man.This article appeared in the November 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.center_img Leicester Tigers and England Lok – Louis MoodyThe professional era has made the concept of a ‘one-club man’ seem as outdated as cotton shirts and players having a pint (or ten) with the opposition after a match. But one player in the England set-up is happy to buck the trend.Born and raised in Leicester, it seems that Louis Deacon was destined to play for the Tigers and, since joining them as a teenager, he has fought his way to become a first-choice lock for England. He says: “It was a dream to play for Leicester from a young age and I never thought about leaving a club I was once desperate to play for. I don’t want to leave unless I have to, and I hope they feel the same.“I feel lucky to be at Leicester. The club has a great culture and great traditions. It’s the only club I’ve ever been at so it’s the only one I know, but I think it’s the best club around.“It’s the players within Leicester that drive the work ethic. Leicester is renowned for the way the boys train, the contact and how physical it is. In the early days I never held back in training, but now, as I’ve got older, I’ve learnt to back off a little and try to prepare as well as I possibly could for the game as that is more important.”His connection with the England manager goes back to his early days at the club when Martin Johnson was the man standing between him and a place in the first team. So it’s no wonder Johnson always turns to Deacon when he is fit – he knows the lock so well.“Ben (Kay) and Johnno were the top two and I was in behind, so I learnt so much from them – it was great experience,” says Deacon. “At Leicester this year it’s the same and we have more second-rows than we’ve ever done, so I’m having the same done to me.“As a young guy training against players like those two I regarded training as my game. They’d come off the game at the weekend stiff and sore for our Tuesday session and I’d be there fresh and ready to go. That’s how it is and that tends to drive the team.”One of the things driving England is a club culture that has come to the fore in New Zealand. When the going gets tough the Class of 2011 will close ranks and stay loyal to one another. Deacon says: “Since Johnno took over that’s been something he’s really focused on. In the past you didn’t really know the other players you were in the England squad with. You’d just talk about rugby and that was it, but now getting to know the guys better has been beneficial for all of us.We wanted a club culture and that is happening. We all know each other very well and we have a good England culture.“That culture comes across when we’re having tough times on the pitch. Look at our opening game in the World Cup against Argentina – some teams would have lost that having been behind after 60 minutes, like we were.”It is a testament to Deacon’s quiet nature that most rugby fans probably wouldn’t regard him as England’s first-choice lock, alongside Courtney Lawes, but it’s clear that Johnson does. Deacon has been involved in every RBS 6 Nations match in the past two seasons, even though he missed the 2010 summer tour of Australasia and the subsequent autumn Tests because of a back injury. Those injuries have stopped him probably doubling his tally of England caps.“Back in 2010 when I missed the tour to Australia it was difficult to see myself playing for England again,” admits Deacon. “But things can change quickly if you’re patient and get your head down. When you’re out of a team that’s the time to work hard. That period was a great time for me because I came back in the best shape I could have done. The last 12 to 18 months have gone really well for me.” Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.last_img read more

Lions 2013: Babies, boots and breakdowns

first_img Captain’s call: Sam Warburton is wrapped up in Brisbane and he couldn’t exert his usual influence at the breakdownBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features Editor in MelbourneWHAT A few days it’s been. The stories have been coming so thick and fast since the Lions’ first-Test win over Australia my head feels a little like a spinning top!  From boots to babies and brushes with the law to body blows, here’s a quick wrap-up of events Down Under…The match itself had everything – apart from a contest at the breakdown! There were some brilliant tries, Israel Folau looking immediately at home on the Test rugby stage and George North producing a spectacular effort. There were big hits and big injuries too – Michael Hooper having to switch from openside to inside-centre early in the second half and doing a decent job. He’s since said: “I’d have loved another 40 minutes there to have another crack. It was really enjoyable.”The same could not be said for the refereeing. Chris Pollock’s policy may produce plenty of quick ball for the attacking side, but allowing defenders to compete for possession at the tackle area is a key facet of the game, one that was missing on Saturday night.Short reign: Geoff Parling was captain for 24 hours!To hear that Brian O’Driscoll and Sam Warburton – two men who have a taste for winning turnovers – stopped competing on the deck for fear of receiving a yellow card is disquieting. Yes, we want quick ball but we also want a contest at the breakdown. It’s over to Craig Joubert this Saturday – hopefully he’ll let players have a go. NOT FOR FEATURED Kurtley Beale might be shopping for some new boots this week. His last-minute slip cost Australia victory at Suncorp Stadium and Warren Gatland has been critical of the Wallaby’s choice of molded boots given the damp conditions. Perhaps there are too many ‘studs’ – in their own eyes at least – in the Australia squad for there to be room for any more on boots. David Campese has said that the current crop care more about how they look than how they play!Geoff Parling’s had quite a week. His wife Elle gave birth to their daughter May by C-section last Thursday – he wanted to watch it live via Skype but was promptly switched off by the midwife! – then he won his first Lions cap when coming off the bench in Brisbane and a day later was named captain of the side to face Melbourne Rebels.Injury blow: Digby Ioane will miss the next two TestsHis reign was short-lived, however. News of Paul O’Connell’s arm injury meant Parling was pulled from that fixture, Ian Evans replacing him in the engine room and Dan Lydiate stepping in as skipper. Now Parling’s poised to be involved in the second Test from the off, although even the Wallabies recognise the huge hole O’Connell leaves – and not in a literal sense. Hooper says: “There’ll have a person just as qualified skills-wise to step up, but it’s a loss for them in terms of what he brings to the squad emotionally.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Parling probably still can’t match Digby Ioane on the drama stakes, though. A warrant was issued for the winger’s arrest after he failed to appear in court on an assault charge on Monday. The following day he did turn up and has been bailed until his court appearance in August. He’s also tweeted: “Love media. Keep talking! God will always have my back.” Perhaps he should look at it another way, though: if players avoided trouble in the first place, the media wouldn’t have anything to write about.Even with all that, I haven’t mentioned James Horwill escaping a ban for stamping on Alun Wyn Jones. Best I don’t either – not sure I can be balanced on him apparently being off-balance!last_img read more

Wales U20 hopefuls run the WAT test

first_imgWhere the magic happens: Wales Centre of Excellence, where a lot of the conditioning work is downIN OUR Pro Insight in the April edition of the mag, our writer heads to Wales’ Centre of Excellence to run through some of the teams conditioning drills. Below is a clip showing some of the youngsters hoping to represent Wales U20s running through one such drill – the knee-quaking WAT (Wales anaerobic test) test. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Six Nations analysis: How Wales resisted Ireland for 49 phases

first_imgIt was the passage of play that sent the Millennium Stadium into raptures and helped turn the Six Nations Championship on its head. We analyse an iconic defensive set from Wales Phase 26: A rare two-pass movement now, Sexton transferring to Heaslip. Lydiate plays lumberjack.Phase 27: Murray finds Sexton on the left again, and Henshaw cuts back in. Webb is the obstacle on this occasion. He does not give an inch.Phase 28: A switch of direction brings no joy for O’Brien, Warburton and Baldwin alert.Phase 29: Heaslip pulls it back to Payne, but – crystalising Ireland’s odd lack of guile in this manic period – there is an ugly muddle as Simon Zebo hunts for the ball:Roberts trips the Ireland wing before Liam Williams and Lydiate slow the breakdown.Phase 30: Paul O’Connell is the carrier as Murray rewinds. Baldwin flies up, though.Phase 31: Sexton looks to find O’Brien off his shoulder. Webb spots the openside from a mile away and suffocates the attack with Warburton supporting. Ireland are forced back over the 22.Phase 32: Murray sees space on the right, slipping to Heaslip. Roberts and Charteris tangle in a mess of bodies.Phase 33: Murray wraps O’Connell and Zebo juggles. Liam Williams and Baldwin do not fall for anything:Williams scents Zebo may be isolated and plunges in over the ball. Referee Barnes judges that he has not released from the tackle. Ireland are awarded a penalty.Phase 34: Kearney uses his left foot to put his team within around 12 metres. Toner climbs to take Best’s throw and Ireland maul:The forwards rumble on before Murray brings it out. He snakes across-field, Henshaw flying into a decoy line with Bowe an out-the-back option.The Ulster wing receives it but Roberts readjusts magnificently to make a phenomenal try-saver:Phase 35: Murray burrows but collides with a red wall, Liam Williams the key brick.Phase 36: Now O’Mahony, centimetres from the whitewash, gets no change out of Lydiate.Phase 37: Henshaw play scrum-half but Best is barricaded by Biggar and Davies.Phase 38: O’Brien positions himself at the base.However, he is slow to react as the ball becomes exposed and Davies outfoxes him, dragging him back three metres:Breathing space.Phase 39: Wales pile in on the counter-ruck so Sexton probes blind. Despite crossing the five-metre line, Heaslip cannot beat Webb.Phase 40: O’Connell comes from deep once more. Biggar and Baldwin soak up the pace and power.Phase 41: O’Brien offers himself on the same angle. Now Jarvis hunts a green shirt.Phase 42: Warburton and Lydiate take more metres out of the attack, felling Heaslip.Phase 43: Murray and Sexton stretch things left and Payne cuts back. Faletau hits the bootlaces and Charteris thunders in.Phase 44: Resurgence. Murray and Henshaw put Zebo in space on the left touchline but North holds up his opposite man and Davies drives through:Joe Schmidt’s men are now 15 metres from five points.Phase 45: Murray sweeps back to feed Best on the right. Alun-Wyn Jones catapults across and Charteris does more man-handling.Phase 46: Murray sniffs an opening left but McGrath discovers a fired-up Davies. Jarvis cleverly disrupts the ruck.Phase 47: Ross rumbles onto the openside off slow ball. Evans and Charteris are on hand.Phase 48: Mirroring that tactic, O’Connell meets rival totem Jones.Phase 49: Sexton slides across the gain-line. Henshaw and Payne cut back, the latter selected to carry.Faletau tackles the New Zealand-born centre while Warburton collides with Sexton. Ireland’s fly half flops back over onto the ruck and is penalised by Barnes for joining the breakdown illegally: Bodies on the line: Luke Charteris and Jamie Roberts combine to tackle Jamie Heaslip As the whistle sounds, the crowd erupts. Jones sinks to the turf in utter exhaustion. In the stands, Warren Gatland glances to the heavens. Attack extinguished. Extraordinary.center_img On Saturday in Cardiff, the media sniping – margarine comparisons and everything – subsided for 80 minutes and some rugby broke out. Incredibly, an emotionally draining Test match lived up to an enormous amount of hype.Its outcome, a 23-16 victory for Wales, has turned the Six Nations Championship. Its defining passage, a seven and a half-minute period between two penalty decisions, was truly iconic.After Wales lock Luke Charteris conceded a penalty for failing to retreat from an offside position as Rhys Webb box-kicked, the hosts went about earning a mighty roar from an enraptured Millennium Stadium.Here is a phases-by-phase run-down of how Wales repelled Ireland.Phase one: Just beyond the Wales 10-metre line, Rory Best throws the lineout to the back. He finds Peter O’Mahony, who feeds Munster colleague Conor Murray.The ball is whipped left to Johnny Sexton and Jared Payne trucks it up, where he is met by Dan Biggar, Dan Lydiate and Sam Warburton:The latter pair hold the ball above the ground for a second, slowing down the attack. Meanwhile, Biggar shows fantastic discipline. Attempting to roll away, he stops on realising he might block the next pass.Desperate not to concede a penalty, he stays as low as possible.“That’s perfect. Thank you, mate,” says Wayne Barnes.Phase two: As Murray heads the same way, Robbie Henshaw hits an out-to-in angle and is felled by Taulupe Faletau.Phase three: Jamie Heaslip comes from depth at pace, but replacement Rob Evans stands firm.Phase four: Murray dummies, darts and makes three metres but is enveloped by Charteris and Warburton.Phase five: O’Mahony makes use of the quick ruck ball and sends Jack McGrath up. Faletau drops him.Phase six: Murray is back on his feet and brings play back to the right, Paul O’Connell taken low by Warburton.Phase seven: Now the backs have a turn, Sexton conducting a wrap-around with Payne. The return pass drops to the floor but Rob Kearney can steam into the line:Leaving his man Tommy Bowe and stepping in, Biggar bravely puts his body on the line before Jamie Roberts completes the tackle. Phase eight: Murray skirts across to go left into midfield, where Heaslip is shackled by Aaron Jarvis and Charteris.Phase nine: The ball is slow but Sexton sends a charging O’Connell over the 22 as the Ireland skipper’s line leaves Warburton flat-footed.Faletau and Leigh Halfpenny, tremendous all day, scramble back to cover:Phase 10: Sexton shows inside and forges ahead. Faletau and Warburton are alert, though.Phase 11: McGrath barrels on to within 10 metres. Jonathan Davies and George North greet him.Phase 12: Sean O’Brien gets hold of it now as Ireland move it right, and is shoved on by O’Connell. Lydiate falls by the wayside so Evans and Warburton must finish the job.Phase 13: Fives metres short, O’Mahony steps past Jarvis. However, Lydiate and Scott Baldwin mop up.Phase 14: Murray sends Heaslip forward. Halfpenny is equal to the task, with a bit of help from Charteris.Phase 15: Sexton is in the game again, switching with Henshaw. Faletau wraps around the Connacht man’s thighs:Phase 16: Payne goose-steps on another run off Murray. There is no way past Biggar and Roberts.Phase 17: Sexton slices around to the right. Baldwin collars the first receiver on the five-metre line.Phase 18: Murray goes left again. O’Mahony gets dragged down by Lydiate.Phase 19: Best is next to knock on the door, but Warburton hits him five metres behind the gain-line and wins the collision.Phase 20: Devin Toner pops to lock partner O’Connell. Fellow British and Irish Lion Davies is on the scene.Phase 21: McGrath maintains Ireland’s right-to-left movement. Webb makes a nuisance of himself.Phase 22: Ireland change tack, O’Connell setting up a maul flanked by Henshaw and Toner. Mike Ross and O’Mahony latch on to gain some momentum:Jarvis and Baldwin spoil things by dragging down O’Connell, the initial carrier. The ball is forced to ground. Wales have time to regroup.Phase 23: Warburton and Lydiate combine to halt Heaslip.Phase 24: O’Mahony builds up speed but Charteris does not bounce off.Phase 25: Around 10 metres from the right touchline, Murray spins infield to McGrath. Baldwin dives in. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

England win Six Nations 2020

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Eddie Jones’s team take title on points difference ahead of France A season like no other, a Championship like no other…Congratulations to 2020 #GuinnessSixNations champions, @EnglandRugby! pic.twitter.com/xwfeU5sfxP— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) October 31, 2020Next on the agenda for England is the new Autumn Nations Cup competition, where they will face Georgia, Ireland and Wales in November before a final match against one of Fiji, France, Italy or Scotland.Head coach Jones is already setting his sights on another trophy, saying: “We’ll have a couple of days rest then get back together later next week and put everything we have into our preparation for the Autumn Nations Cup. It’s another really important tournament for us and I’ll be expecting the same levels of application as we work towards performing at our best.“We’d also like to thank all of our supporters. It’s strange not having fans in the stadium and we know it is a tough time for the country but we felt your support throughout the campaign and it does make a difference. Hopefully we can continue to deliver more good moments for our fans in the coming weeks.”England will be presented with the Six Nations trophy upon returning to their Lensbury hotel base tomorrow. Key score: Tom Curry celebrates scoring the bonus-point try in Italy (Getty Images) center_img The result at the Stade de France means that England’s 34-5 win against Italy in Rome earlier was enough to pip the title.Watch #SixNations reaction on BBC One, BBC iPlayer and here: https://t.co/1gQncxF2bd#bbcrugby pic.twitter.com/IHojAV6do8— BBC Sport (@BBCSport) October 31, 2020The England result meant Ireland needed to beat France by seven points (six if they scored a try) to lift the trophy while France needed to win by a margin of 31 points and score four tries. Neither side could achieve their target – France won 35-27 – so England have duly been crowned champions.Related: Cian Healy scores a try on 100th Test appearance England win Six Nations 2020England are this year’s Six Nations champions.This is their third championship title in five years under Eddie Jones and they top the table on points difference ahead of France.With the Red Roses already crowned Women’s Six Nations champions – they are hoping to secure back-to-back Grand Slams by beating Italy tomorrow – it means England have done the double in 2020.England’s men beat Italy 34-5 in Rome but the title was not confirmed until the end of the France v Ireland match in Paris on Super Saturday as both those sides were also in contention.Related: Ben Youngs marks 100th England cap with two tries Owen Farrell described the title triumph as a “massive achievement” and believes there is still much to come from this England team, which reached the World Cup final a year ago. The captain said: “It feels like we’re just getting started.“We had four new caps (Jonny Hill, Tom Dunn, Ollie Thorley and Ollie Lawrence) today, a guy who got 100 caps in Ben Youngs and Jamie George got 50, so there’s a brilliant blend of experience and youth to drive us forward.”last_img read more

Fe y salud: un nuevo año de bienestar para el…

first_imgFe y salud: un nuevo año de bienestar para el cuerpo, la mente y el espíritu Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] ¿Qué aspecto tiene un nuevo comienzo?Para muchos el Año Nuevo es para planificar cambios positivos y forjar nuevas metas para el bienestar: dietas sanas para el corazón, regímenes cardiovasculares o nuevas matrículas en el gimnasio. Pero ¿qué pasa con la salud del otro “corazón”? ¿Cuán a menudo necesita que le recuerden que  hay que nutrir y ejercitar el espíritu?Cuando el difunto Dr. George Sheehan, un filósofo del jogging, impartía charlas motivacionales a corredores, con frecuencias citaba a la esposa de un converso a las carreras: “mi esposo solía ser metodista. Ahora es corredor”. Correr puede no ser una religión, pero Sheehan diría que es un retiro, un lugar para comunicarse con Dios y con usted mismo, un evento para la renovación psicológica y espiritual”.Para prepararse para un reciente retiro de una semana de duración sobre la salud integral del clero, la Rda. Ronnie Willerer, rectora asociada de la iglesia de Nuestro Salvador [Church of Our Saviour] en Jacksonville, Florida, se comprometió a caminar todos los días con su esposo valiéndose de su podcast  “Camine y siéntase bien” de CREDO, un programa de salud y bienestar de la Iglesia Episcopal. La serie del programa consiste de cuatro semanas de reflexiones sobre el mensaje del Salmo 139 —“maravillosamente he sido formado”— para acompañar una caminata de 30 minutos.“En el pasado, siempre hacía ejercicios para perder unas cuantas libras o como un tiempo que compartía con mi marido. Pero en los últimos dos años no hemos actuado al respecto de manera tan deliberada”, dijo Willerer en una entrevista reciente para Episcopal News Service. “Era una buena excusa, no, no una excusa, una buena razón. Las meditaciones demostraron llevarme en una dirección diferente que el mero ejercicio, porque las meditaciones se concentraban en la magnificencia de la creación de tu cuerpo y en la salud de tu cuerpo”.Discutieran o no la meditación diaria, ella y su marido encontraron que la caminata de 30 minutos era un tiempo para entablar una conversación profunda y hacer una reconexión. Sus feligreses comenzaron a seguir el programa del podcast y han estado usando muchos de los materiales de CREDO para los retiros de mujeres y a comprometerse personalmente a combinar los ejercicios físicos con el bienestar espiritual.Elizabeth McKay Moosbrugger, entrenadora personal y profesional certificada, es una de las redactoras del programa. Para Moosbrugger, el ejercicio y la oración marchan juntos. Durante sus trotes matutinos, ella repite como un mantra la oración de Osvaldo de Nortumbria.“Yo digo, ‘Todo lo que soy, Señor, lo pongo en tus manos’ y pienso en todos los papeles que he desempeñado en mi vida”, le dijo ella a Episcopal News Service, “A eso sigue ‘todo lo que hago’, y pienso en ese día que tengo por delante y lo que en él debo hacer ajustada a mi horario, y pongo todas esas cosas en manos de Dios… Me desacelera el cerebro y me da la sensación de estar conectada con Dios. Las cosas que parecían abrumadoras, ya no lo parecen al final de mi carrera”.Sus colaboraciones a la serie examinan la manera en que el cuerpo funciona como un don de Dios, la manera en que el cuerpo se nutre de alimento, trabajo y relaciones; y lo que eso significa para Dios.“Es refrescante salir de esa experiencia de apoyar y amar a nuestros cuerpos”, afirmó ella. “Eso es así especialmente para los ministros, porque necesitan fuerzas para apoyar a sus comunidades”.La Rda. Fairbairn Powers, de la iglesia episcopal de Santa Inés [St. Agnes] en Little Falls, Nueva Jersey, corre en el Triatlón de los campeonatos mundiales de la Union Age Group y de Sprint World en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda.“Esta combinación de bienestar íntimo y externo es esencial para el ministerio”, dijo a ENS la Rda. Fairbairn Powers, sacerdote encargada de la iglesia episcopal de Santa Inés [St. Agnes’] en Little Falls, Nueva Jersey. “Me atrevo a decir que muchas personas no se ejercitan tanto por el bien de sus cuerpos como por [descargarse de] sus emociones —todas esas cosas del alma. Como sacerdotes [el ejercicio] hace posible hacerle frente a [los problemas] con los que tenemos que lidiar en nuestras parroquias”.Powers ofrece una oración intercesora por un feligrés en cada vuelta de su diaria rutina de nado, bicicleta o carrera. La triple atleta de 73 años comenzó a correr maratones y a hacer esquí de fondo cuando estaba en los cuarenta. Recorrió a retazos todo el Camino de los Apalaches en sus aventuras campestres en su cincuentena y sesentena. Y ahora en sus setenta y tantos, terminó recientemente un Triatlón internacional de los campeonatos de la Union Age Group y de Sprint World, en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda, quedando en tercer lugar entre los competidores de su edad.Para un artículo del 2 de enero de la Diócesis Episcopal de Newark, sobre su teoría acerca del valor del ejercicio físico para el clero, Powers, lanzó una pregunta acerca del ejercicio en la lista de correos electrónicos del clero diocesano: ¿Se ejercitan regularmente los miembros, y ello les aporta un cambio significativo a su vida parroquial, personal y familiar?Ella escribió que más de 35 respuestas llegaron de personas que corren y hacen jogging (el Rdo. Ed Hasse encabeza su lista con 26 maratones y los que van sumándose —él ora mientras corre por las mañanas), así como los nadadores (el Rdo. John Hartnett encabeza este grupo, al nadar dos kilómetros y medio cada mañana y encontrar que esto “me da una paz que rara vez experimento en el resto del día”).  La diácona Nancy Read encuentra que su carrera larga “libera mi alma y alimenta mi cuerpo”.Una sacerdote cambió su programa diario para darle tiempo cada mañana a la oración, la meditación y a levantar pesas en el gimnasio luego de una “advertencia” médica. Muchos caminan; una pareja monta a caballo; algunos practican yoga, buceo y baile; varios de ellos son ciclistas. Al menos cuatro, incluidas Powers y la Rda. Cathy Deats, son triatletas.Un sacerdote que hace senderismo al menos una vez a la semana, dijo “es como la oración… y enriquece mi relación con el Creador”.Para Powers, el mensaje común fue que el ejercicio es un tiempo para centrarse, para entrar en conexión con Dios, y que el ejercicio regular da lugar a que el cuerpo, la mente y el espíritu mejoren. Unánimemente, el clero [diocesano] le dijo a Powers que el ejercicio los afirmaba y los hacía llegar a un estado en el que realmente podían orar.“Creo que somos seres integrados, de manera que nuestro cuerpo, nuestra mente y nuestro espíritu funcionan juntos”, dijo a ENS el obispo Bishop Mark Hollingsworth Jr. de la diócesis episcopal de Ohio. “Cuando me mantengo atento a mis disciplinas de ejercicio y estudio y oración, soy más saludable en los tres aspectos”.El obispo Mark Hollingsworth Jr. de la diócesis episcopal de Ohio, lleva a cabo la recaudación anual de la Vuelta Ciclista del Obispo.Hollingsworth, que es un ciclista infatigable, lleva a cabo, a través de toda la diócesis de Ohio, la Vuelta Ciclista del Obispo, la campaña de recaudación anual que atrae a episcopales de todas las edades y capacidades. Él también va en bicicleta a las convenciones generales  —incluida una travesía de 6.400 kilómetros desde Anaheim, California, hasta el Centro denominacional de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York.“Las endorfinas cambian nuestra perspectiva, pero yo creo también que cuando ando en bicicleta abandono mi manera de ser”, afirmó. “Me concentro en bicicletear, en ese ritmo y en mi respiración, y ello me despeja la cabeza. En un sentido me saca de mi rutina y de los pensamientos en que habitualmente tiendo a caer cuando me concentro en los problemas difíciles”.Katharine Jefferts Schori, la obispa primada, ha afirmado que algunas de las más importantes iniciativas de los últimos años para el bienestar del clero han conllevado el tener presente la salud y el equilibrio, incluidos programas como Volver a Empezar [Fresh Start] y la labor de CREDO.En una entrevista en enero de 2010 con Peter K., consejero de salud y experto en un estilo de vida saludable, Jefferts Schori dijo, “La conciencia de la salud en su más amplio sentido es realmente de lo que se ocupa la Iglesia. Jesús dijo que él vino para que pudiéramos tener vida y vida en abundancia. La vida abundante se refiere a las relaciones restauradas con nosotros mismos, con Dios y con nuestros prójimos”.Corredora, senderista y alpinista durante mucho tiempo, Jefferts Schori es ella misma un modelo de estilo de vida saludable. “Cuidar el cuerpo que tenemos… es parte esencial de cuidar el equipo con el que hemos de ministrar al mundo… ¿Amas lo que haces, amas y respetas la herramienta que te han dado en tu cuerpo?, pregunta ella. “Decidir cómo trato a mi cuerpo, como empleo mi tiempo, como encuentro esparcimiento, es un modo de servir y un modo de estar preparada para servir”.El concentrarse en cómo el bienestar corporal puede sostener la mente, el cuerpo y el espíritu puede ayudar a las parroquias a asumir un enfoque holístico de la vida: fomentando la armonía conyugal, mitigando los factores laborales que causan estrés y proporcionando un tiempo de actividad en familia. Las iglesias a través del país están usando la preparación física como un instrumento para divulgar el evangelio y edificar la comunidad. Las parroquias están incluyendo clases de yoga, caminatas y Zumba [un programa de danza inspirada en música latina] en un esfuerzo por hacer que sus congregaciones sean más sanas y por hacer de la iglesia un nexo para las necesidades de los feligreses; por ejemplo, la iglesia episcopal de San Juan-La Gracia [St. John’s-Grace] en Búfalo, Nueva York, ofrece clases de danza moderna y de ballet. El Centro de la Vida Parroquial [Parish Life Center] en la iglesia episcopal de San Juan en Memphis, Tennessee, auspicia campamentos de baloncesto y fútbol para niños, fútbol americano de banderines y carreras conmemorativas de 5K.Para el Rdo. Scott Richardson de la iglesia episcopal de Santa María Virgen [St. Mary the Virgin] en San Francisco, el ejercicio tiene más que ver con la comunidad y la camaradería que con el deber o con un esfuerzo doloroso. Sus feligreses  se reúnen semanalmente para hacer caminatas a través del Puente la Puerta de Oro [Golden Gate Bridge] y Campo Crissy; él camina diariamente con su esposa y sus perros, y disfruta frecuentes partidas de golf con sus hermanos.“Si estoy físicamente saludable, vigilando mi ingesta de azúcar, absteniéndome de tomar bebidas alcohólicas, eso resulta un buen ejemplo para mi congregación”, le dijo él a ENS. “La gente reciben las bendiciones [que se derivan] de eso en su propia vida, y uno nunca sabe qué influencias llevan a las personas a cambiar”.Más de 1.250 personas —laicos y clérigos— se han comprometido con el programa “Camine y siéntase bien” de CREDO, el comienzo de un nuevo hábito de equilibrio espiritual y físico.“Haya estado o no el ejercicio entre sus perspectivas, esto es una gran plataforma para las personas que creen que algo debe cambiar en sus vidas”, dijo Moosbrugger. “Comenzamos con estas altas metas y luego llueve o se enferma un niño y algo nos saca de nuestra rutina diaria. ¿Qué nos trae de vuelta a las cosas que queremos hacer y que son buenas para uno?  Para mí, llegar a darme cuenta de que he sido formada maravillosamente constituyó una parte importante de mi vida de ejercicios”.Jefferts Schori está de acuerdo. En su entrevista con Peter K, dijo: “No creo que no tengamos tiempo para hacer ejercicio. La mayoría de las personas, cuando tienen una rutina de actividad física, descubren que disponen de más tiempo y energía para el resto de su vida diaria”.– Sarah Moïse Young es una reportera independiente radicada en Charleston, Carolina del Sur. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. 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South Carolina court temporarily restrains use of diocesan names, seal

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bryan Hunter says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Nicholas Forde says: Tags South Carolina January 24, 2013 at 5:18 pm ^^^ sorry, “sell” not “sale” January 24, 2013 at 8:06 pm It matters not a tinker’s cuss what the Episcopal Diocese is called. The Diocese of Charleston? The Diocese of Christ’s Table at Table Rock? Who cares? It’s still the Episcopal Diocese, and that’s what matters. How about the Diocese of Judge Diane S. Goodstein. This would probably annoy her, so might be a good idea. Greg Fry says: January 24, 2013 at 2:30 pm What kind of world do we live in? Really, the Episcopal Church can’t use “Diocese of South Carolina”? John M Stevenson says: Chris Walchesky says: January 24, 2013 at 2:47 pm Nope. Sorry, Moputo. That name is registered to the REAL Diocese. Under SC law, religious entities such as congregations and dioceses can become incorporated legal entities. That is exactly what the Diocese did many years ago (1973 or so). As such, it has registered three names and a registered trademark recognized by the SC Secretary of State’s Office in Columbia,SC. That other group does not hence -they need to incorporate under a different name or face possible fines for being in violation of the TRO. According to some lawyers, those fines could get very expensive very quickly as courts/judges typically do not like it when court orders are ignored!The Temporary restraining order says that only certain individuals and officers of the Diocese can use the name. Those individuals are clearly listed in the TRO. NO ONE else may use the names and/or diocesan seal (registered trademark). Alas, that group’s website still uses the name and diocesan seal. I hope some of their people have deep pockets to pay for these fines! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 24, 2013 at 3:36 pm Carol McRee is correct. The Diocese of South Carolina incorporated in 1973. Since our esteemed PB has no regard for the rule of law, it should be of no surprise that she would ignore the ruling. The ECUS is in an uphill battle in South Carolina. First, the ECUS is the defendant and not the plaintiff. They will have to defend their actions and why they violated their own canon law(s). Secondly, the Denis Canon was effectively voided/ignored in the All Saints Pawleys Island trial (in which the Diocese of SC joined the ECUS as plaintiff). Plus, the membership of the SC Diocese has some very deep pockets who will fight this to the end as they have been harrased by the national church going back to Bishop Salmon. If I was Ms. Jefforts Shori, I would pack it up and move on to another diocese to continue her scorched earth strategy (Dallas, Albany, and Western LA are most likely on her radar.). She’s most likely met her match in South Carolina. January 26, 2013 at 8:54 pm With all due respect, we initiated a defensive action in SC. “So much law and order….” No one can dispute that the law and order policy was instituted years ago by TEC against orthodox parishes and diocese. That’s a poor argument. It is difficult to condemn your opponent for doing once what you initiated and what has become your own usual course of business. TEC people watched other Diocese be attacked and ravaged by TEC. They boast about it in blogs. Don’t act shocked that we did not wait to become victimized by outsiders. January 24, 2013 at 9:12 pm This is such Southern SECESSIONIST nonsense. Southern dioceses also did the same thing when they were on the Wrong Moral side of slavery in the U.S. As an African American Episcopalian I am enraged that the same bigotry in the name of God continues to haunt the South. Vance Mann says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 25, 2013 at 5:26 pm Another mess like Pittsburgh. Evangelicals on one side and liberals on the other. The fighting was so horrible I found Buddhism to be my redemption. Christians love hating each other. Have at it. Jesus will be so impressed by your devotion. Bryan Hunter says: John M Stevenson says: Donald Hill says: John M Stevenson says: John M Stevenson says: Hank Otto says: January 24, 2013 at 7:06 pm It seems to me that 41 out of 71 parishes with 11 undecided that are not associated with TEC would be a MAJORITY, rather than SOME churches that are no longer associated with TEC. The arithmetic says this. Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 24, 2013 at 5:36 pm I will leave Mr. Lawrence and those who join him to their tempest in a teapot. If you believe that The Episcopal Church has abandoned the “faith once delivered to the Apostles”, then I assume you will form a church that best meets your needs, with a name that people will not associate with The Episcopal church. January 26, 2013 at 10:13 pm You’re funny Mr. Stevenson Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI January 27, 2013 at 7:36 pm Excuse me, emendation: neglected adverb “necessarily” before “…make it right …”. (Still working on perfect, Lord.) January 24, 2013 at 5:10 pm Mr Wilkinson, we were The Protestant Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina before there WAS an Episcopal Church USA. TEC doesn’t have a monopoly on the term “Episcopal. ” Episcopal simply signifies a church polity headed by a bishop. There are other denominations in the States with “Episcopal” in their names: The African Methodist Episcopal Church; the Reformed Episcopal Church; the Methodist Episcopal Church (historically, before it became the United Methodist Church). The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina isn’t going to abandon its history or its identity simply because TEC has chosen to abandon the “faith once delivered to the Apostles.” John M Stevenson says: Hank Otto says: January 26, 2013 at 2:10 pm Maybe anticipating that the order is, in fact, temporary? Bryan Hunter says: January 27, 2013 at 5:55 pm Arithmetic? Majority may rule but but that doesn’t make it right any more than might makes right. Bryan Hunter says: Bryan Hunter says: January 25, 2013 at 10:23 am Here we go – you’re playing the race card. That’s what all you liberals do when you can’t win an argument by its merits. What gives you any authority to judge who is Christian? Typical angry liberal. Joseph F Foster says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR January 24, 2013 at 11:37 pm True, Grant! Beers, a wealthy white man, gets more wealthy, while people that truly need the money are forced from their homes by Beers’ 1%! January 26, 2013 at 3:22 pm TEC “abandon”? Opinion, not fact just because you say so. January 27, 2013 at 12:19 pm Thank you. But about texts, today’s reading attributed to Paul from I Corinthians spoke to me (at least): “… God so arranged the body, giving the greater honor to the inferior member, that there may be no dissension within the body, but the members may have the same care for one another. If one member suffers, all suffer together with it…”. As I’ve said before in another posting, I’m a member of the Standing Committee in our diocese (3d term with appropriate breaks) and we voted against ordination of Mark Lawrence as Bishop in 2006 because he would not give a straight answer to questions but engaged in nuance.; we were well aware of anecdotal information that the Standing Committee of Diocese of SC wanted a Bishop to lead them out of TEC. The second time around in 2007, he assured our Bishop that it was not his intent to lead the Diocese of SC out of TEC and so we consented (with bare majority of our members) in 2007. I made excuses for him in that he appaeared to be walking a fine line between conservative and progressive elements of the diocese. However, like a leopard, he revealed his spots so to speak. I was disappointed in him because I was among those who took him at his word and, now, it appears his word meant little. How much will that mean going forward? I’m still looking for the grace in all this rancor and vilification stemming from those who “disaffiliated” with TEC. Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (75) January 24, 2013 at 5:00 pm I thought Mr. Lawrence, and those who wish to follow him, decided to leave The Episcopal Church. Why would they want to keep names that are affiliated with The Episcopal Church? January 24, 2013 at 9:20 pm The church does not exist to meet my needs. The church exists to glorify Christ crucified, dead and resurrected and to proclaim him as King of kings and Lord of lords. That is the root of the problem with TEC: it has become anthropocentric rather than christocentric. Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal News Service] A South Carolina Circuit Court judge Jan. 23 issued a temporary restraining order preventing any “individual, organization, association or entity” from using registered names and marks that are claimed by Mark Lawrence and other leaders who led some Episcopalians in that state out of the Episcopal Church.Judge Diane S. Goodstein’s order is in effect until Feb. 1 when a hearing is scheduled.The order says Lawrence and 24 other people associated with him are the only ones who may use the diocesan seal as described in its registration with South Carolina Secretary of State as well as the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” “The Diocese of South Carolina” and “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.” Those three titles were registered on Nov. 5, 2010, according to the order.The temporary restraining order is related to the suit that was filed in state circuit court Jan. 4. The action, the original plaintiffs said in a press release at the time, was taken “to protect the diocese’s real and personal property and that of its parishes.”The suit also asked the court to prevent the Episcopal Church from “infringing on the protected marks of the diocese, including its seal and its historical names, and to prevent the church from assuming the diocese’s identity, which was established long before the Episcopal Church’s creation,” according to the press release.Goodstein’s Jan. 23 order made clear that the restraining order applies only to the names and seal, and not the other matters alleged in the suit. The judge said in the order that a hearing was needed because the group of people who opposed Lawrence’s departure from the Episcopal Church has “allegedly and repeatedly” been using the names and the diocesan seal, “including those so similar that they are perceived to be the Diocese of South Carolina.”“This use has the clear ability to cause extraordinary confusion over the corporate identity of The Diocese of South Carolina,” she wrote.The judge noted that the plaintiffs are concerned that a group of people who want to remain in the Episcopal Church plan to hold a meeting Jan. 26 at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston. That gathering “could intentionally affect the corporate status of those uninformed that the actors are not, in reality, the corporation” known as the Diocese of South Carolina.That meeting is meant, according to a notice issued Dec. 13 by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, to elect and install a provisional bishop and other lay and clergy leaders, consider resolutions dealing with “recent purported amendments to the Constitution and canons of the diocese” and any other matters “that may be properly brought” to the meeting.Retired Diocese of East Tennessee Bishop Charles vonRosenberg is expected to be nominated as the provisional bishop during the Jan. 26 meeting.It is anticipated that the group meeting that day may choose a temporary name under which to conduct its business and operate at least during the time until the Feb. 1 hearing.The Jan. 4 lawsuit was amended on Jan. 22, according to information here, to add 15 more congregations, bringing the total number of congregational plaintiffs to 32.A Jan. 23 press release about the restraining order said that 44 of the 71 congregations involved have joined the suit while 16 have remained with the Episcopal Church and 11 are undecided.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. January 24, 2013 at 6:54 pm If the TEC bunch assume any name other than the one the judge banned them from using, that is proof that Diocese can leave TEC. Back off Mrs. Schori. Let the charade go that you are hierarchical, as you erroneously put forth. Cut the losses at 22,000,000 US dollars in legal fees and call it a day. January 25, 2013 at 5:34 pm Brian Hunter, the church exists not just to glorify God but to do His work in the world. To be a follower of Christ means to follow the commandments of Christ: to feed the poor, to clothe the naked. A faith that prays loudly in public but does not seek to be the hands and feet of Christ in the world is a hollow faith. If seeking to serve our fellow humans in the love of Christ and as Christ commanded is what you call “anthropocentric”, so be it. I grew up in a splinter “continuing” Episcopal church (part of the 1979 splinter movement) run by a bunch of people who felt mighty superior that they were “following the faith”, but from what I could see they were petty, mean-spirited, prideful and not overly Christian. I went back to the mainstream Episcopal church as an adult and am proud of our stance for social justice. Some of my fellow parishioners are the most humble, good, giving, and truly Christian people I’ve ever known. I’ve been hearing that trope about The Episcopal Church not keeping the faith of the apostles for the last 35 years. It wasn’t true then, and it isn’t true now. January 24, 2013 at 6:14 pm I am sad, just so sad, about my home diocese. Forty years ago, it patiently nursed me into a deeper vocational call, and I will always hold those times and people sacred in my heart. January 24, 2013 at 5:16 pm And one further point, if you decide you no longer want to live in Oregon, so you decide to move to Illinois, The State of Oregon won’t insist that it now owns your house just by virtue of the fact that it happens to be geographically located there. Guess what? You get to SALE your own house in Oregon, which after all you paid for, and keep the proceeds (imagine that!). AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Jan Rogozinski says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Grant Carson says: January 26, 2013 at 1:05 pm Please note, I said “provisional” … look it up. Robert H. Crewdson says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Steven Long says: Milton Finch says: January 25, 2013 at 5:12 pm SCHISMATICS! Tod Roulette says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 24, 2013 at 8:41 pm I think it’s pretty funny that Mark Lawrence’s sect still wants to cling to the “Episcopal” name. After all, don’t he and his sycophants think we Episcopalians are a bunch of heretics? The irony … it burns! By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 24, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 January 25, 2013 at 11:31 am Ms Fox, with all due respect, The Diocese of South Carolina is not seeking or claiming anything paid for by money or gifts designated to The Episcopal Church. That’s a straw man. The suit for declaratory judgement is, in part, for money and gifts given to individual parishes and/or the diocese. When money was given 260+ years ago to build my own home parish, St Michael’s, TEC did not even exist. Those gifts were given to the parish. If there is attempted theft by any party, it’s The Episcopal Church. Steven Long says: Bryan Hunter says: January 24, 2013 at 8:09 pm Mr. Hunter…all cities in Virginia are not part of a county. There may be locations taking on the name of a city (Fairfax) but it is not a city only a county. This is the law in Virginia…and has nothing to do with Charlottesville wanting to be seperate from the county of Albemarle. Also TEC is the identified and “legal” representative of the Anglican Communion in the USA. Since Mr. Lawrence has decided to take his church and diocese (which is not his but the larger church’s) out of The Episcopal Church so do so and change your name and identy and move on. Many of us are and will be praying for The Presiding Bishop as she visits South Carolina. Bryan Hunter says: January 24, 2013 at 11:34 pm Blowing off 4000 years of the hallmarks of religion seems the be the behavior of TEC that has driven hundreds of thousands of Christians from the original homes of their youth. And for $183.33 a pop per soul. Pop it TEC, pop it! Does Mrs. Schori really think that a true Christian will trade their soul for $183.33? Hank Otto says: January 24, 2013 at 4:43 pm By long standing Anglican trafditon we are geographically defined and described. A parish leaving a diocese or a Diocese leaving the denomination makes as much sense to me as a county in Indiana deciding it wants to be in independent of the state or wants to be part of Oregon. People from a county can move anywhere they want to. But the jurisdiction belongs to the entity of which it is apart. And simply saying “I don’t want to be part of Indiana and would prefer to be part of Oregon”cannot make it so in the tradition we have and claim to value. Moputo Jones says: Michael Russell says: Lisa Fox says: January 24, 2013 at 6:39 pm Well, they could always assume a provisional title of Episcopal Diocese of Lower South Carolina. John M Stevenson says: January 26, 2013 at 3:02 pm Not all who disagree with you are liberals. Besides, liberal need not be a perjorative any more than being labeled en evangelical is. Robert Felton Britt says: January 24, 2013 at 4:51 pm Don’t forget Central Florida January 24, 2013 at 10:05 pm Whyever in the world would they want to retain such a name? They quit the Episcopal Church and now are Congregationalists. Parishes are at liberty to blow off Mark Lawrence as he has blown off TEC. This is simply more of the pusillanimous behavior that is their hallmark. January 24, 2013 at 9:25 pm Milton & Bryan, you two are pretty het-up against TEC. Whatever the law may say, the Bible is pretty clear: “Thou shall not steal.” For over 200 years, gifts have been given and property has been purchased on behalf of The Episcopal Church. As a matter of justice, Mark Lawrence and his sect don’t get to steal it now. As to what the courts may decide, I don’t know. January 25, 2013 at 9:22 am “Sale” may turn out to be prescient. When the Protestant Episcopal Church in the USA, now calling itself “The Episcopal Church”, realizes it has won a Pyrrhic victory in States where it has wrested the sessecionists’ property back because it now will have a lot of nearly empty churches to pay the upkeep and mortgages on, it will have to find some way of getting out from under those real liabilities. Watch for lots of church sales.center_img January 25, 2013 at 11:06 am You need to send your post to Mrs. Shori. The ruling by the Circuit Court very clearly states that the names and seal are the property of the Diocese of SC. Mrs. Shori is not a corporate officer or director of the Diocese and the Diocese is not a legal subsidiary of TEC. The PB and her cronies breached the law by unauthorized use of the names and seal (a/k/a theft). January 25, 2013 at 10:13 am Mark Lawrence is following scripture. I cannot say as much for the PB. January 24, 2013 at 5:05 pm You’re conflating unrelated things. A parish is not equal to a country; a diocese is not equal to a state; a denomination is not equal to a country. At least not in THIS country, by specific design of our Founding Fathers–and TEC’s founding fathers, for that matter (who were practically one and the same, after all). BUT, believe it or not, a city can actually elect to leave a county (e.g., Charlottesville, VA, is geographically in the center of Albemarle county, yet it is independent and not a part of the county) , and there have been cases where cities bordering two states have left one state to join another. And there is a fairly famous case of roughly one half of a state leaving the other half of the state and forming its own state (West Virginia ring a bell?). John M Stevenson says: Connie Hoar says: January 24, 2013 at 11:27 pm In addition to South Carolina, I expect TEC to lose big time in Fort Worth. The matter has gone to the supreme court of Texas. We expect their decision this spring. “Litigate until they capitulate” not only is un-Christian, but may turn out to be very bad policy as well. The only one who may come out ahead in all this mess is David Beers, Schori’s chosen chancellor, whose firm is collecting a goodly portion of that $22,000,000 in legal fees. January 26, 2013 at 8:39 pm I have to agree with the dissenters. Everything I have given to me church was not given to TEC. You will have an uphill battle showing me how a gift to a parish at which I worshiped while being repulsed by actions taken at 815 was an intent on my part to create a gift, outright or in trust or otherwise, to TEC. We in SC do not think nationally and never have. We act locally and always have. Thank goodness the South Carolina Supreme Court has already ruled on this matter, but God only knows how much we are going to have to spend to reach the end…… Milli Hayman says: January 25, 2013 at 9:31 am I’m not so sure that “The Anglican Communion ” is a legal or corporate entity in the United States or the States severally. Any readers actually know? John M Stevenson says: Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Carol McRee says: Joseph F Foster says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Chet Wilkinson says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA January 24, 2013 at 5:15 pm Donald – Steven Long’s post above explains it in this case:Secondly, the Denis Canon was effectively voided/ignored in the All Saints Pawleys Island trial (in which the Diocese of SC joined the ECUS as plaintiff).And, it was a few years back, but West Virginia exists becs it split off from Virginia over the slave issue. That might or might not be used in court as an example. January 25, 2013 at 9:57 am Being a member of the Episcopal Church in MN, where the emphasis is on living out our calling in our state, rather than the name “Diocese”, I think those who are so into legalistic titles should hang right on to the name. I think the Pharisees would fully understand and those trying to carry on the work of Christ will find a way. (I am not speaking for all MN folks, just for myself …) January 24, 2013 at 9:18 pm Twenty-two million dollars spent in legal maneuvering. 120,000 souls leaving the TEC. That comes to $183.33 per soul. That is little to spend for the saving of a soul. Yet, if one comports it to property, that is a lot of money spent for a few things that have no soul. Figure the expenditure. Figure the spirit behind the move. Judge likewise. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC January 25, 2013 at 11:15 am You raise a good point. In Charleston alone TEC would really find itself in a bind if were to “win” church property. I serve on the vestry of a parish with a large 262-year-old church building and grounds that are National Historic Landmarks and brooded over by Historic Charleston Foundation, the Architectural Review Board, etc, as it happens to be in the “Old and Historic District” of downtown Charleston. As a vestryman, I also happen to know (quite clearly!) what it takes to operate and maintain such an edifice. There is no way on God’s green earth that a “remanant” congregation of 50 people could afford to even keep a roof on the place. The monthly utility bills alone would likely outstrip their total annual income. Any idea how much maintenance costs on a 200-year-old organ? Any idea what the going rate is on a master plasterer when a leak occurs due to condensation (which happens about three times a year? All this is just the tip of the iceberg. Now multiply that times six or seven (the number of such historical parishes located in and around Charleston alone). The thing is, Historic Charleston Foundation and Architectural Review board would not look too favorably on any application to liquidate these “assets” to convert them into hotels or condos (there is population and parking density control on the lower Charleston Peninsula). What on earth would TEC do with a whole handful of empty, 200-plus-year-old church buildings that it would be required by local ordinance to keep in tip-top shape? Dog in the manger. Randolph Charles says: Steven Long says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Bryan Hunter says: Hank Otto says: January 26, 2013 at 3:12 pm Who comprises the “angry” in this charade? Why necessary to resort to labeling by painting all who may be in disagreement with your and your ilk’s position with the same brush? Tsk-tsk. Chris Walchesky says: January 26, 2013 at 7:05 pm Well …. From the perspective of this unabashed sycophant, several things come to mind. You are probably correct in that a lot of us view a lot of people, not all but nevertheless a lot, of people in TEC as heretics. I don’t mean this in the apparent petty way you meant sycophant in your posting. I am simply admitting to the fact of what you were suggesting. We feel justified in retaining our historic name for three reasons not the least of which is the fact that it is OUR name. It was not a gift from 815. The second reason is that we are episcopal in that we have parishes under a Bishop. Yes we know that you say + Lawrence is no longer a bishop. We disagree and are prepared to support him. Lastly, we feel we have the right to do so because we DO feel very deeply that it was TEC that abandoned Christianity and not us. If TEC wants to go their way – fine. However, it is not we who changed and it is not we who will change our name. By the way, why does me supporting Mark Lawrence in positions I begged his predecessor to take make me a sycophant but you touting TEC lines not make you one? I really don’t think you are a sycophant – just a tad sardonic. Chet Wilkinson says: John Speller says: Milton Finch says: Milton Finch says: January 25, 2013 at 11:43 am I see that the new TEC diocese being formed in South Carolina is still in contempt of the court order by trying to hide behind a new domain name. The following official link still misappropriates the name Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina and the diocesan seal, in violation of the Temporary Retraining Order: http://scstewardship.com/ Coleen Tully says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET John M Stevenson says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA January 24, 2013 at 5:59 pm I don’t have time to look up the reference, but there was a similar case in the 18th century in Scotland. Money had been left to pay pensions to the wives of Presbyterian ministers. Some folk sued because the Presbyterians no longer believed in the Calvinist doctrines of their ancestors. The English courts ruled in favor of the wives.That has been the common law principle. If an a legally recognized body has existed continuously, it retains its property, and its officers can manage that property in accordance with the rules of the body. During the previous century, there were numerous similar situations regarding Greek Orthodox and Russian Orthodox denominations. As far as I know, the courts always have sided with the denomination in such cases. The Lawrence group is playing fast and loose with immemorial legal traditions.Also, note that the United States constitution recognizes only the federal government and the states. Municipalities are creatures of a state. If a city was able to secede from a county, then it did so only after appropriate legislation was passed in the state assembly. Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ January 24, 2013 at 10:10 pm Oh, grow up. Mark Lawrence and his groupies are acting like a bunch of teens. Who would ever want to confuse them of being followers of Jesus? So much law and order and so little grace says to the world we can hardly be Christian. South Carolina has always been on the cutting edge of seceding from something – e.g. war of southern insurrection in 1861. Press Release Service January 25, 2013 at 11:25 am Mrs. Hoar, we are praying for her as well, as we did at our vestry meeting last night. We do not wish any ill will on her, TEC, or those in the Lowcountry who wish to remain in TEC. That is their choice and their right, and we respect that. But TEC has contributed NOTHING–not one red cent–to the cost or maintenance of diocesan or church property (quite the reverse, as a matter of fact). This idea that some organization headquartered in New York can claim as its own and take property and funds that it didn’t contribute to in any way, form or fashion from those who have and are paying for it with their own finances and the sweat of their brows is absurd, and that anyone would actually see that as anything other than theft is incomprehensible to me. Surely any sane, reasonable person would agree. Otherwise the world really has gone mad. Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments navigation Newer comments January 25, 2013 at 10:29 am Tod Roulette: Is that all you liberals can do: play the race card? This is not about race; it’s about the rule of law; however, to you the law is just a suggestion. January 26, 2013 at 8:30 pm I hope you are wrong but fear you are right. As one in the middle of this fight and not merely a spectator on the sideline jabbing the dogs in the pit to make them fight all the harder, I have to consciously struggle with civility every time the matter comes up. I am angry I had to leave the church I thought I would see my grandchildren baptized in because it was one of those that did not follow Bishop Lawrence. I am not angry with my fellow congregants because I know them and know them to be acting out of the same conviction in their positions that I am in mine. They are friends and family. However, I am deeply impassioned, just as those TEC Carolinians are who had to leave their churches because they stayed with the Diocese. How wonderful it would be if we were allowed to work it out among ourselves as families outside of court, mending fences instead of throwing salt on open wounds. Outsiders do not understand how South Carolinians think or work. That is painfully evident from the posts on this site, but we would and we could. However, we are a unique lot and will not back down if challenged. Both sides espouse the love of Christ. It will be the first thing to go when the fight is engaged. You are right. That is the pity. With all due respect it is not a credit to any of us in this mess that a person who is not of our professed faith should see so evidently what we cannot Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Nicholas Forde says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Steven Long says: Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Milton Finch says: Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments navigation Newer comments Nancy G Chesnutt says: January 25, 2013 at 8:04 pm Wow – you might want to check out Proverbs 16:18 and Isaiah 2:11. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL January 24, 2013 at 3:27 pm Given that ENS has posted this story, surely TEC is aware of the court order, which was effective immediately. Given that, the TEC group that has been impersonating The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, in violation of South Carolina corporate law, is clearly in contempt of court as they still have their Web site up prominently featuring the diocesan name and seal, in direct defiance of the court order. Whatever influence TEC has in the Lowcountry of South Carolina should be brought to bear on this group to convince them to adhere to the order of the South Carolina Circuit Court. Judges tend not to treat contempt of court lightly. January 26, 2013 at 3:49 pm Proof texting? … hmm, wonder who fits those shoes. John M Stevenson says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Bryan Hunter says: Bryan Hunter says: Featured Events January 24, 2013 at 3:07 pm AEEoSC!!!!!! Sally Rowan says: January 25, 2013 at 11:38 am One further point, Ms Fox. If I do get “het up” over the issue, it’s because I happen to serve on the vestry of one of these parishes. Protecting the finances and property of the parish is part of my sworn duty. I happen to be privy to how gifts are given by whom and to whom in my own parish. They are not given to some nebulous organization in New York. They are intended for the mission of the local parish and, to a lesser extent, our diocese. You betray a dim understanding of the history of Anglican polity. From the beginning the central functioning unit in Anglicanism has been the local parish, not dioceses (or archdioceses, for that matter, which, by the way, were intentionally eschewed by TEC). Lisa Fox says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bryan Hunter says: Rector Washington, DC John M Stevenson says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET South Carolina court temporarily restrains use of diocesan names, seal January 27, 2013 at 3:24 pm Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Video: Bishop Gray offers the grace of Mississippi’s ‘brokenness’

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ State of Racism, Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Video Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Diocese of Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray III describes how the diocese can offer its “brokenness” and the brokenness of the cross to the rest of the church and the world as a way to combat racism. Gray made his remarks at a Nov. 15 news conference before the opening session of “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America,” a two-day gathering sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Mississippi at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 18, 2013 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Video: Bishop Gray offers the grace of Mississippi’s ‘brokenness’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

General Convention takes a first step, admits: ‘Alcohol affects us…

first_img July 10, 2015 at 4:52 pm “Scripture does not condemn drink (alcohol) or drinking of alcohol; rather, Scripture says no to “drunkeness.” I agree 100%. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The House of Bishops on July 1 passed three resolutions, one with an amendment, on the issue of alcohol and drug abuse.“I’m Mark and I’m an alcoholic,” said Bishop Mark Hollingsworth of Ohio, chair of the Legislative Committee on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, as he introduced the resolutions to the House of Bishops and acknowledged his own journey of addiction and recovery.Hollingsworth said that the committee represented “hundreds of years of sobriety and recovery.” He expressed “profound gratitude” to the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies for establishing the committee and thanked all the bishops for their affirmation of the work.Resolution D014 recommends that ordinands should be questioned at the very beginning of the discernment process about addiction and substance use in their lives and family systems.The bishops also passed Resolution A159, which acknowledges the church’s role in the culture of alcohol and drug abuse.Hollingsworth said A159 is intended to give direction in how the church can move forward in owning that reality of complicity and in healing.Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe said that Europe is, in many ways, “far behind the U.S. in understanding alcohol and drug addiction.” The resolutions, he said, “will enable us in Europe to put forward the policy in our church…to address a culture of denial in many respects.”Resolution A158 adopted a policy on alcohol and other substance misuse and encourage dioceses, congregations, seminaries, schools, young adult ministries, and affiliated institutions to update their policies on the use of alcohol and other substancesDeputies examine ‘unhealthy and unholy’ relationshipA day earlier, deputies had overwhelmingly supported the resolutions, asserting the time has come to transform the church’s “unhealthy and unholy relationship” with alcohol and addiction.“We have lived too much into the jokes of ‘where there are four Episcopalians, there is a fifth’ and ‘we are whiskey-palians’: we must redefine the norm,” said the Rev. Kevin Cross, a deputy from Easton, Maryland.Deputy Mary June Nestler of Utah said that alcohol topped the list of diocesan inquiries during preparation for General Convention.“The No. 1 question that came into our offices went like this: Can we get a drink in Utah? Will we be allowed to drink in our hotel rooms? Can our group hold an evening meeting and serve alcohol? Can I bring alcohol in from other states?’“We must address this in our corporate culture.”After Maryland: courage to change the things we can Paraphrasing the prayer popularized by recovery ministries, Deputy Scott Slater of Maryland, told deputies June 30: “I ask God to grant me the serenity to accept legislative actions I cannot change. I pray that we as a church will have the courage to change the things we can.”Slater, a member of diocesan staff, said former Suffragan Bishop Heather Cook’s drunken driving arrest for manslaughter in the Dec. 27, 2014, hit-and-run death of cyclist Tom Palermo, a 41-year-old husband and father of two, “has shaken so many of us and we have yearned for our denomination to take a hard look at this issue.”Legislative Committee 22 on Alcohol and Drug Abuse was created by the presiding officers to do just that and “there was a clear charge to us to conduct our work with compassion for all affected by the devastating effects of alcohol misuse and addiction,” said deputy Steven Thomason of Olympia, a co-chair.“Many members of the committee and several who testified in our hearings shared their experiences with alcohol. Many shared their shameful experiences of the church’s complicity in a culture of alcohol,” he said. “Some have even felt unwelcomed or stigmatized by the church simply because they are in recovery.”The Rev. Steve Lane, treasurer of Recovery Ministries of The Episcopal Church, was stationed at a booth during General Convention and said he is excited to see the church finally beginning to face the challenges of addiction.“Addiction is rampant in every congregation in our church, I believe, in one form or another,” he told Episcopal News Service.“The best known solution for it is a spiritual one, but our church needs to be aware of it and see our own shortcomings and be aware of our own failures first before we can reach out and help others.”Retired Bishop Chilton Knudsen of Maine, who will begin assisting in the Maryland diocese in October, is a recovering alcoholic, an experience that is central to her ministry, she told ENS recently.“When the case in Maryland happened, my heart broke, as everybody’s did,” she said. “There’s some good leadership in Maryland, and good recovery, and those folks are part of the forward movement in the diocese.”Advocating abstinence is not the answer – training is, she said, and understanding addiction not as a moral issue but as a health issue. “Many denominations that do advocate abstinence have the same rate of alcoholism as we do.”Rather, she is advocating for a sense of “intentional awareness that some people are at risk, and to make our social life so hospitable that it’s not weird or strange if you decline to drink.”Updated policies and training for seminarians and communities of faith are needed “the way we make anti-racism training mandatory, the way we make sexual misconduct training mandatory,” Knudsen said.Otherwise, “the church can be helpful, or can really help foster somebody’s denial or support their being sick for awhile.”And finally, she said, becoming healthy requires telling the truth about who we are and requires telling our stories. “The tragedy in Maryland presents us with an opportunity,” she said.Deputy Doris Westfall of Missouri agreed. “The church holds out the hope of living into recovery, which is no less than resurrection,” she said.When urging adoption of Resolution A159, Westfall said: “This resolution also recognizes that addiction is a complex disease, that it needs to be treated in its totality and with all the support and love that we can muster as the people of God.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan and Matthew Davies are part of the Episcopal News Service team reporting on the 78th General Convention. Editor’s note: This story was corrected Sept. 9 to remove an inaccurate description of Resolution A158’s intent. Rector Tampa, FL General Convention, Comments (18) Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 8, 2015 at 8:10 pm I am a pastor and life-long Methodist until retirement when I returned to Mother Anglicanism. I am also a recovering alcoholic with 20 years of sobriety. The denomination in which I served in full-time ordained ministry has the rubric in its Book of Discipline: “The pure unfermented juice of the grape shall be used…” in the Eucharist. This has been one of the stumbling blocks to full communion between the United Methodists and Episcopalians. Aside from being contrary to Scripture, the practice has its roots in the Methodist participation in the temperance movement of the last Century. I don’t believe it has made any difference in the number of abnormal drinkers in that church. The use of grape juice instead of wine in the Eucharist has its own set of problems. For example, the only way the common cup can be used is by intinction since grape juice lacks the sanitizing capabilities of wine. Abstinence from alcohol is something I MUST practice as an abnormal drinker. The vast majority of clergy and laity, however, are not abnormal drinkers. I am able to receive the wine of the Eucharist, appropriately enough, like a child — by intinction. It seems to me the Episcopal Church can be hospitable to recovering alcoholics like me without requiring abstinence from the entire membership. My religious order, the Order of Saint Luke, usually has one chalice under the sign of wine, and another under the sign of dealcoholized wine or grape juice. My parish is hospitable to persons who cannot tolerate gluten by providing gluten free hosts. It would be quite easy to, in like manner, provide an alternative for those who cannot tolerate alcohol. It’s a little more work for the Altar Guild, but not an awful lot.Alcoholism is a serious disease and it is good that we are looking for ways to be in ministry to the 10% or so of the adult population who cannot drink like normal men and women. Education is a good starting point, and my local parish has had an excellent Recovery Weekend which I commend to every Episcopal Church. A balanced approach which avoids the extremes of prohibition and being “whiskypalians” is not only in order here, it’s downright Via Media Anglicana! July 1, 2015 at 8:08 pm Try a little controlled drinking. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jim Cutshall says: Featured Events Bob Bates says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 2, 2015 at 9:14 am Why would we be surprised? Alcoholism is everywhere. I minister in the prisons and many are there because of alcohol and related drug use.Why would a church be different?Why does the obvious require a resolution?AA has transformed many lives.Our tool chest should contain many tools to help one another.This is but one of many that faces man. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Annette says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cindy Clark Selby says: Mack Allison says: Moira Cradgwyn says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem July 2, 2015 at 2:37 pm As an alcoholic with 21 years in recovery, I am also tired of the “Whiskey-palian” jokes and the frequent spotlighting of alcohol at our church events. As a member of the Evangelism Committee at my parish, my heart broke recently when I approached a newcomer to welcome her, and she replied, “I was looking for a good party church, and I think I’ve found it!” Party church? Really? I don’t even know how to respond to that. martha knight says: Rector Washington, DC July 2, 2015 at 2:15 am We should retire the phrase “drugs and alcohol.” We should instead say, “alcohol and other drugs.” Alcohol is as much a drug as heroin or cocaine or Vicodin, but because it is legal for adults, we shy away from that label. July 11, 2016 at 2:47 pm I am saddened by the curse of alcoholism, and I am also saddened by the nannyism displayed in so many of these responses. The latter is more frightening. Is it possible that the Episcopal Church is now led by self-righteous old cat ladies? (political incorrectness intended) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Moira Cradgwyn says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 2, 2015 at 8:56 pm For four years, I offered non-alcoholic wine at our weekly Eucharist at the Homeless shelter where I serve. Great for people who were not alcoholics–good taste, sense of wine, a fine alternative. Or so I believed until one person told me he was addicted to our non-alcoholic wine, another told me that our alcohol-free communion wine triggered a relapse, a third said, “I’ll skip the bread; I just want the wine.” We now serve grape juice. It’s a gesture of hospitality for all. Selena Smith says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. July 1, 2015 at 9:04 pm Praise God for Resolution A159 and for the courage of the clergy and bishops in recovery to take the leadership on waking up the church. Although some of us have been trying to train and educate clergy (see http://www.goalproject.org/resources) it has been an uphill ministry. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 2, 2015 at 2:04 am I’m not totally sure what was meant by “try a little controlled drinking” but I don’t think it evidences either understanding or empathy. I say this as a person for whom “controlled drinking” proved over 40 years to not be an entirely feasible option. Twenty-two years of ‘controlling’ drinking by choosing not to include alcoholic beverages in my social or solitary activities has worked pretty well for me. And I’ve often found myself in situations where it is assumed that alcoholic beverages are the beverages of choice, perhaps especially for our clergy. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Pat McCaughan and Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 1, 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 2, 2015 at 11:18 am I praise the fervent work that is addressing the prevalent use of alcohol in TEC especially in parish events. As someone who has been in recovery for 25 years I applaud this work. Years ago when I participated in The Alpha Course in my parish, bottles of wine were in abundance for every session. This saddened me deeply. We are in all of this together. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Susan Allison-Hatch says: Press Release Service Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 11, 2016 at 2:51 pm The problem may well be in the clergy, not the bottle. David Loving says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 2, 2015 at 10:22 am I hope now that the next step will be to offer Grape Juice at Eucharist.The only rationale for using Wine is from Lambeth Conferences in 1888 and 1908. It’s now 2015 and we know that for many the smell/taste of wine may be more related to the last drunk than “The Blood of Christ”. Jesus did not pass the bread and say to his disciples they had a choice of bread only. July 8, 2015 at 9:15 pm Scripture does not condemn drink (alcohol) or drinking of alcohol; rather, Scripture says no to “drunkeness.” Submit a Job Listing Terry Webb says: Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention 2015 Featured Jobs & Calls Kathleen Kuczynski says: Rector Martinsville, VA Frank Bergen says: Robert Horwath says: General Convention takes a first step, admits: ‘Alcohol affects us all’ Bishops and deputies approved task force, update policies July 7, 2015 at 7:50 am As a life long episcopalian and an alcoholic, this discussion brings about mixed emotions. I feel that my recovery began in earnest when I stopped asking the world to change around me, so I have long accepted that Episcopal gatherings usually involve wine. On the other hand, at least acknowledging that alcoholism exists in our denomination helps many people. There were times in which I could not, given our culture, accept that I was an alcoholic and an Episcopalian. It seemed that I’d have to give up one or the other. Also, communion wafers are really terrible without any liquid to help them down. The common way alcoholics take communion is to receive the wafer, and skip the wine. July 3, 2015 at 8:02 am I believe many of the comments here go toward intolerance and Prohibitionism. Your problems with alcoholism will not end by wiping out the presence of alcohol. Just because some of you state are unable to be social or controlled drinkers doesn’t mean that millions of others can’t. We already live in a society where unprecedented numbers of people have quit going to church and declare “no religion” in large part because of the visibility of the religious right in politics–trying to enforce their wills on others. We should certainly develop a culture in our churches in which we understand and recognize addiction of all kinds and be loving, understanding, and helpful to all. Further, just because of your experience doesn’t mean “all parishes” even have an issue with their current policies. Seamus P.Doyle says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Lee Cunningham says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Lee Cunningham says: August 2, 2015 at 4:06 pm Unfermented grape juice should be offered on our altars along with wine since we never adopted the eucharistic theology of the Latin church regarding proper matter in regard to the Eucharist or their doctrine of validity. The presence of Jesus in the eucharistic elements is essentially mysteriological and thus use of grape juice makes sense for us or should…it should be offered to the faithful, especially children, teen agers, and those challenged by alcohol addiction along with those who prefer it who have come into our tradition from ecclesial communities which do not use fermented wine for communion. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 3, 2015 at 10:42 pm I also hope that the Episcopal Church will officially authorize the use of non-alcoholic grape juice for communion. We are a progressive denomination and we have rescued ourselves from fundamentalism and from narrow and outdated thinking in so many ways. Why do we cling to the necessity of including alcoholic content in the “fruit of the vine”? Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more