Digital broadcasting one step closer

first_img7 August 2008The government has approved the Broadcasting Digital Migration policy for South Africa’s conversion of television broadcasting signals from analogue to digital, while also approving the local manufacture of set-top conversion boxes.The migration has been made necessary due to developments in telecommunications technologies, which enable a more efficient use of the radio frequency spectrum, as well as ensure better quality of pictures and sound.Once migration begins, television users will have to purchase locally manufactured set-top boxes which convert the digital signal for use on currently available analogue TV sets.The decision to promote local manufacture of the set-top boxes in high volumes will provide a boost for the local electronics manufacturing sector and help create additional jobs.Subsidised set-top boxesThe government has also agreed to help approximately five million of the poorest television owning households, by providing up to 70% of the cost of set-top boxes. Funding for this subsidy could possibly be sourced from the Universal Service and Access Fund.In February 2007, the government agreed that South Africa’s digital signal would be switched on on 1 November 2008, and its analogue signal switched off on 1 November 2011.This allows for both the digital and the analogue signal to be broadcast concurrently for a “dual-illumination” period of three years.According to the Department of Communications, it is on track to start broadcasting a digital signal on 1 November 2008, and will provide digital broadcasting and mobile TV by 2010.Increasing access to informationDigital broadcasting enables providing services in a multiplicity of languages, thereby increasing access to information, while it will also allow viewers to access on-screen programme guides for the various channels.The inclusion of a return path compatibility feature enables the user to send and receive messages through the set-top box, which could see them serve as important tools for access to government information and services in the future.The feature could enable the provision of fully interactive e-government services over the digital network, such as accessing, filing and submitting various government-related forms, without the viewer having to leave the comfort of their own home.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

2018 Wheat Harvest Cab Cam — Farm Science Review

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This cab cam, sponsored by Fennig Equipment, jumps in the combine with Nate Douridas, farm manager of the Molly Caren Agricultural Center — the grounds for the Farm Science Review. With the window between dry and wet weather hard to find, the farm is taking whatever opportunity it can to get work done in the field with their crops of all kinds progressing along at breakneck pace. Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood has more in this video.last_img read more

Facebook Blocks Defriender, App for Tracking Friend Removals

first_imgAn iPhone application released this week from a company called i-Doodz tracks those who have “defriended” you on the social networking site Facebook. Defriended, as the app is called, takes its name from the slang word that means “to remove from one’s list of friends (e.g. on a social networking site)”, according to Wikitionary, an open content dictionary that operates like Wikipedia for words.The Defriended app gives you an easy way to track these defriending events since Facebook itself doesn’t provide this feature – or at least that’s what the app did until Facebook blocked its operation. Apparently, the social network thinks defriending should be a private matter. As of now, the app is no longer available for download in the App Store.The way Defriended works – or rather, the way it used to work – was simple. Each time you launched the app, it would scan your Facebook friend list and compare that scan to the previous one. Any friends that went missing between scans were listed. Unfortunately, the little side project created by an i-Doodz developer was in violation of Facebook’s platform developer agreement. In section 2, Facebook warns developers that they may not circumvent the company’s “intended limitations” on core Facebook features. Specifically, it reads: “you must not notify a user that someone has removed the user as a friend.” In other words, Facebook doesn’t want you to know who doesn’t want to be your friend. Today, a message on the i-Doodz site states:Last week our developer was bored one evening, had an idea, and a few hours later uploaded the “defriended” iPhone app. it unexpectedly got a lot of attention, then subsequently Facebook blocked the app, causing it to stop working. We will be looking at how feasible it is to make the app work without a corresponding facebook app, but in the meantime if you’ve bought the app you should ask apple for a refund – and please do…we don’t really want to get money for an app you paid for and that doesn’t work. We apologise for the inconvenience.Tracking Defriending Events – A Bad IdeaWe suppose that if you were notified every time someone removed you as a friend, you might get angry or hurt – feelings Facebook wouldn’t want you to associate with their site. After all, social networking is supposed to be about making connections, not ending them… or is it? Even worse, you might contact the person doing the defriending and ask them, “Why?” This may force them to re-add you out of social politeness when really they had no longer wanted to retain the connection. Although it seems like a petty move to block Defriender from operating, it makes sense. Social networking connections are meant to mirror our real life friendships… at least that’s what Facebook thinks. As two people go their separate ways in life, friendships fade. They’re meant to. Very few people maintain a meaningful relationship with everyone they’ve ever met and became friends with throughout their life. In fact, if you tried to do so, it would be overwhelming. So while it may be nice to catch up with your best friend from junior high or your old college roommate via Facebook, after some time – and very little interaction after the first “How have you been?” – those connections should be able to fade away again just like they did in real life.Even though Facebook doesn’t alert users now when they’ve be defriended, the decision to thin the list is still a bit uncomfortable for some people. What if they notice?! Chances are, if you haven’t communicated with the person in months on end, they won’t. We promise. Still, to avoid the whole messy defriending situation in the first place, the best method is to simply not accept the friend request to begin with. That’s what the “ignore” button is for. However, if you slipped up and have contaminated your News Feed with these non-friends, it’s time to remove them. An article in the New York Times from January 2009 suggested that proper Facebook friend etiquette involves culling your friend list once per year to remove “total strangers and other hangers-on.” (We think heavy Facebook users may need to do that a little more often.) The article, an examination of our new social morals, shows how the act of defriending is just as much a part of social networking as the initial friending request is. Tracking these events via an iPhone app or any other service would be an unnecessary – and potentially painful – process. Let’s let the defriending continue quietly… the way it was intended to be. (Image credit: geek.com) Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Tags:#Apple#Facebook#social networks#web center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos sarah perezlast_img read more