Vermont Technical College names Philip Conroy new president

first_imgVermont Technical College,Philip Conroy, Jr., Ed.D. has been appointed president of Vermont Technical College by the Vermont State College’s Board of Trustees following a six-month nationwide presidential search. Dr. Conroy comes to Vermont Tech from Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts, where he serves as vice president of enrollment management and marketing, responsible for admissions, financial aid, marketing, publications, the web site, public relations, and retention related activities.Conroy, who has served in a variety of roles at Mount Ida since 1997, is an internationally recognized expert on higher education management, particularly in the areas of strategic enrollment management and institutional advancement.‘I am excited for Vermont Technical College and the Vermont State Colleges,’ said Gary Moore, Chair of the Vermont State Colleges (VSC) Board of Trustees. ‘I believe Phil Conroy is the right person to take the college to new levels. He is an inspiring educator and leader who will be an asset to the college and to the state.’VSC Chancellor Tim Donovan echoed Moore’s comments, adding, ‘When you look for a next president of a college, you seek the right person for the time and circumstance of the institution. The college community, the Board of Trustees, and I all agree that Dr. Conroy has the skills and character to lead Vermont Tech to an expanded role in Vermont’s economic and educational future. I anticipate that we will see Vermont Tech’s value to Vermont reach even greater heights under Dr. Conroy’s leadership.’Prior to his service at Mount Ida, Dr. Conroy served as the director of development for the College of Food and Natural Resources at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Director of Development and founding Executive Director of the Bridgewater State University Foundation, where he also served as a faculty member, financial aid counselor, and alumni relations director.He has more than thirty years of teaching and management experience in higher education, including resource development, endowment management, volunteer and constituent management, strategic enrollment management, financial aid, integrated marketing, international and multi-cultural education, transition to college and the first year of college. In addition, he has earned a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation from the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Conroy is a frequent presenter at conferences and workshops in Europe and North America on enrollment management, academic affairs, and institutional advancement issues, and he’s served in a number of volunteer positions, both in higher education and in his local community.‘I am extremely excited about joining the Vermont Tech community,’ Conroy said following his appointment Thursday night. ‘During my visit to campus in November I was very impressed by the ambition of the Vermont Tech community to plan and adapt to the changing educational needs of the state of Vermont, and its desire to expand the college’s influence both within the state and beyond where appropriate. We all understand the realities and challenges posed by the declining numbers of high school students graduating from northern New England high schools, as well as the financial realities of operating a public college in a state with limited financial resources. As I look ahead, I see Vermont Tech becoming an example of how strong an institution can be with a profound commitment to its public mission despite limited public funding.’‘I am also intrigued by the potential for Vermont Tech evolving into an ‘applied university’ serving the state of Vermont and greater New England region. Through partnerships statewide with business leaders and other institutions, the college could potentially evolve from its roots as an associate degree institution to a recognized and well-respected bachelor’s degree institution. This, in fact, is what I have been involved with at Mount Ida for the past thirteen years. There are some very exciting and intriguing possibilities ahead for Vermont Tech, and I am looking forward to joining the faculty and staff and bringing those possibilities to reality.’Conroy earned his Doctorate of Education in educational leadership from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; his Master of Education in educational administration from Rhode Island College in Providence, Rhode Island; and his Bachelor of Science in education from Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. He has also completed graduate studies at the University of Tampere, Finland; University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and Boston College.He will assume Vermont Tech’s presidency on April 1, replacing interim president Patricia Menchini, who was named to the position when former president Ty Handy resigned in June, 2010.Founded in 1866, Vermont Technical College is a public, coeducational, undergraduate institution offering more than 25 bachelor’s and associate degree programs. Vermont Tech currently enrolls approximately 1,650 students. For more information, visit us on the Web at www.vtc.edu(link is external).RANDOLPH CENTER, VT ‘ December 10, 2010 ‘last_img read more

Video: Notre Dame RBs, WRs Give Shoutouts To Fighting Irish NFL Hall of Famers Jerome Bettis, Tim Brown

first_imgNotre Dame's Jerome Bettis.Notre Dame Jerome Bettis Tim BrownSaturday night was a good night for the Notre Dame football program. The Fighting Irish witnessed two of their former players, Jerome Bettis and Tim Brown, reach the sport’s pinnacle. Bettis, who played running back at ND from 1990-92, and Brown, a wide receiver in South Bend, Ind., from 1984-87, were inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame. This morning, Notre Dame’s current running backs and wide receivers gave shoutouts to Bettis and Brown for their achievements. One more shoutout to our Hall of Famers ( @JeromeBettis36 & @81TimBrown ) from our RBs/WRs. #GoIrish pic.twitter.com/kazzqZVd3E— Notre Dame Football (@NDFootball) August 9, 2015Bettis and Brown are certainly two players the current Notre Dame student-athletes should be aspiring to emulate. Notre Dame opens its season Sept. 5 against Texas.last_img read more

3-Star OT Cordavien Suggs Drops Top 10 Via Twitter

first_imgCordavien Suggs' top 10 list.cordavien suggs top 10Three-star offensive tackle Cordavien Suggs, a 6-foot-6, 260-product of Neptune Beach, Florida, has announced his top 10 schools. Suggs, who is a class of 2017 player, has four SEC programs on his list – along with three ACC schools. He has an interesting mix of programs – from Florida to FAU.Suggs’ list is not in order – and he joked after that he should have presented it in alphabetical order. Check it out:My current Top 10 #Hailstate #Swamp17 #VolNation #Gamecocks #TarHeels #OwlsUp #Wazzu #StripeEmUp #GoCardinals #GT pic.twitter.com/1JpkakxukP— Cordavien Suggs (@_73era) May 18, 2016I really should’ve did that list in alphabetical order— Cordavien Suggs (@_73era) May 18, 2016Suggs is crystal-balled to Mississippi State, according to 247 Sports.last_img read more

Foreign investors pull out Rs 38930 cr in 201819 Sebi annual report

first_imgNew Delhi: As macroeconomic headwinds weighed on investor sentiments through the year, foreign portfolio investors pulled out Rs 38,930 crore in 2018-19, according to market regulator Sebi’s annual report. “In order to further develop the Indian securities market as an avenue for fundraising, eligibility norms for FPIs (Foreign Portfolio Investors) were relaxed and data privacy concerns of FPIs were addressed,” the 2018-19 annual report said. Among other steps, the watchdog had withdrawn the minimum residual maturity restriction of three years for investment in government securities and state development loans. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalBesides, sub-categories under the category of corporate bonds were discontinued resulting in a single limit for FPI investment in all types of corporate bonds, as per the report. The limit for FPI investment in debt was revised from Rs 6.49 lakh crore to over Rs 6.98 lakh crore for the April 2019-September 2019 and more than Rs 7.46 lakh crore for October 2019-March 2020, it noted. To address concerns over data privacy, a provision similar to One Time Password (OTP) was introduced, wherein, an intermediary can access information related to beneficial owner, including senior managing official of an FPI only after confirmation from the FPI or its global custodian. Additionally, measures like relaxation of eligibility norms for FPIs, monitoring of foreign investment limits, easing the process of on-boarding of FPIs were taken.last_img read more

First known Canadian cases of canine influenza found in two Ontario dogs

first_imgTwo dogs in southwestern Ontario have tested positive for a strain of canine influenza in what health officials are calling the virus’s first known incursion into Canada.The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit said the dogs were brought to Canada from South Korea through the United States late last month and were showing signs of respiratory disease during a veterinary exam the next day.A small number of dogs that came into close contact with the pair also have mild respiratory disease but test results for those animals are not yet available, the agency said.It says the H3N2 canine influenza virus is highly transmissible between dogs and has become widespread in parts of Asia and caused outbreaks in some U.S. locations, particularly in shelters.The health unit said most dogs who develop the disease don’t get seriously ill, and typically show symptoms similar to those from other respiratory infections such as the so-called kennel cough.Dogs who show symptoms of respiratory disease, such as decreased appetite and fever, should be kept away from other dogs for at least two weeks to limit spreading, it said.Health officials said there is no known human risk from the virus, but note the risk that it might mix with human seasonal influenza viruses is “a potential concern.”“The investigation and response are ongoing, and at this point, the concern mainly involves the imported dogs and their close contacts,” they said in a statement.“Affected and exposed dogs are being confined by their owners to help prevent further spread. However, dog owners in Windsor and Essex County should be vigilant and watch for signs of respiratory disease in their dogs, particularly dogs that frequently have contact with other dogs.”last_img read more

Weather warnings remain in place with strong winds and heavy snow predicted

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A winter storm warning and blizzard warning remain in place with heavy snow forecast throughout northeast B.C. and Alberta.Thursday afternoon a blizzard warning was issued for the Pine Pass, that remains in place as the forecast still calls for heavy snow in the area and wind gusts up to 60km/h.  The winter storm warning issued for the B.C. South Peace is also still in effect.The South Peace could see a total of 30 to 40 cm of snow by Saturday morning. Areas near and along Highway 16 east of Prince George towards McBride and Highway 97 north of Prince George and those near Tumbler Ridge may see near 50 cm by Saturday morning. A slow moving frontal system will spread snow and strong winds across the B.C. central and northern interior. This long duration snowstorm will produce a total of 30 to 40 cm of snow by Saturday morning. Areas near and along Highway 16 east of Prince George towards McBride and Highway 97 north of Prince George, and those near Tumbler Ridge may see near 50 cm by Saturday morning.As the frontal system collides with an advancing Arctic cold front today, strong winds will continue over parts of the northern interior generating poor visibilities in blowing snow.Snow will abate tonight or early Saturday as dry Arctic air settles in.Rapidly accumulating snow will make travel difficult. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow. Poor weather conditions may contribute to transportation delays. If you must travel, keep others informed of your schedule and destination and carry an emergency kit and mobile phone. In the North Peace, we will see heavy snow today with up to 15 cm forecast.  The wind will also be an issue gusting up to 30km/h in Fort St. John.  The strong winds will make it feel more like minus 36.The heavy snow is also forecast to fall in Alberta, with weather warnings in place for most of the communities along Highway 43.  Click here for a full list of weather warnings.Before you head out on the roads, visit www.drivebc.ca for current road conditions in B.C. and visit 511.alberta.ca for road conditions in Alberta.Below are the two warnings in place for northeast B.C.Winter storm warning in effect for:B.C. South Peace RiverA long duration snowstorm is forecast.center_img Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to BCstorm[email protected] or tweet reports using #BCStorm.4:54 AM PST Friday 01 February 2019Blizzard warning in effect for:Highway 97 – Pine PassBlizzard conditions with gusty winds and visibility frequently near zero in snow and blowing snow are expected or occurring.A slow moving frontal system is producing heavy snow through Pine Pass. An Arctic high pushing through the pass will generate winds of 40 km/h gusting to 60. The snow and wind will combine to produce near whiteout conditions today.The winds will begin to ease this evening and visibility will improve but occasional blowing snow may still occur until late tonight or early Saturday morning.Travel is expected to be extremely hazardous due to reduced visibility. Consider postponing non-essential travel until conditions improve. If you become stranded in a vehicle do not leave. The vehicle offers a form of protection from the cold. A single person walking through the snow is harder to find than a stranded car or truck.Weather in the mountains can change suddenly resulting in hazardous driving conditions.ShiftIntoWinter.ca reminds drivers to know before you go. Adjust to winter driving behaviour and use winter tires and chains.Road conditions are available at www.drivebc.ca.last_img read more

Talks on fighting racism to build a safer more inclusive BC

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for Sport and Multiculturalism will be in Fort St. John, Wednesday, July, 24th, 2019 to talk on fighting racism.These community dialogues are open to;Organizing Against Racism and Hate membersLocal MLAsLocal government representativesCommunity leadersIndigenous leadersSchool District RepresentativesFaith leadersRacialized community leadersImpacted individualsKahlon will be travelling across the province this summer to meet with community leaders to discuss local, emerging issues on racist and hate incidences. Kahlon wants to hear from leaders and organizations across the province who are passionate about building an inclusive British Columbia. Kahlon shares he wants to encourage every person in B.C. to consider how they too can fight against racism and hate in their own lives.He shares these consultation meetings are one of many steps being taken to confront and eradicate racism.Currently, these meetings are not open to the public. These are targeted dialogues with community leaders and the Province’s existing network of organizations who are leading work on these issues.To read more; CLICK HERElast_img read more

Good better Best Gymnast carries battered Buckeyes

Plagued with injuries that sidelined four girls for the remainder of the season, the OSU women’s gymnastics team will rely heavily on the shoulders of junior Rebecca Best in 2010.“Her role will continue to be one of our most consistent competitors,” coach Carey Fagan said. “So we’re going to lean on her pretty heavily again this year.”Best is Ohio State’s first returning All-American in gymnastics since 1999. Best earned All-American honors on floor in last year’s National Championship and scored a 9.850 on floor at the April 16 NCAA Championship. She became the sixth Buckeye to earn national laurels in gymnastics.When recruiting Best, Fagan said she recognized the potential in her athletic prowess.“[Best] has a natural quickness and speed, and she’s incredibly strong,” Fagan said. “Those are all things in gymnastics you have to have.”On her recruiting trip, Best said the connection she felt with the girls played a major role in her decision to come to OSU.“One of the first things I noticed when I came here was how close all the girls were,” Best said. “Then I fell in love with the campus when they took me on the tour.”In her time at OSU, Best has amassed some impressive honors and accomplishments within gymnastics.Last season, Best was second in the all-around, vault and beam while ranking third on floor and bars among the Buckeyes. In ’08 and ’09 she was named a second-team All-Big Ten honoree. At the 2009 NCAA Central Regional Championships, Best posted a career-high all-around total of 39.350 for the second consecutive time (a 40.000 is a perfect score in all 4 events). She was named the OSU team’s Impact Player on beam and earned the “O”-chievement Award for most valuable performer.And that was just her sophomore season.But Fagan said the biggest growth she’s seen in Best in her time at OSU is not in her gymnastics, but in her sense of leadership. Although an aggressive competitor, Best is quiet and her personality is reserved, Fagan said.“I think as a member of the team she’s really developing as a leader in terms of sharing her experiences with the other kids, really developing that whole concept of being on a team,” Fagan said. “Contributing not just as an individual, but how she can help her teammates, giving them tips here and there.”Associate Athletic Director and Sports Administrator for OSU gymnastics, Heather Lyke, also recognizes a progression in Best’s overall performance. “She is determined to improve every year and continues to grow as a leader on our team,” Lyke said.At their home opener in St. John Arena on Jan. 16, the Buckeyes took second to Oregon State, where the loss of girls due to injury seemed to affect the team’s overall performance.Despite Best’s slip up on floor near the end of the meet, Fagan believes the pressure of being the athletic leader of the team will help Best in the long run.“I think she’ll snap out of it, because she learns with every mistake that she makes,” Fagan said. “Very rarely does she make the same mistake twice.”What makes Best unique among gymnasts is her continued increase in difficulty level over the years, Fagan said.“That’s not typical in college gymnastics. A lot of time kids come and have to maintain their skills as they get older,” Fagan said. “But Rebecca’s still developing and I think she’s going to continue to be a standout.”What Best likes most about gymnastics is not the applause or the recognition for her multiple achievements, but rather a simplistic enjoyment of acrobatics.“I like to flip and I like to go as high as I can. It’s just fun to see how many skills [I] can do,” Best said. “I like to get the scores and see how much better [I] do from the last meet.”Although she says staying consistent is one of her main goals for the season, Best added to her beam routine a handspring-layout-layout. Imagine someone flipping onto their feet from a handstand, followed by two front flips with legs straight out, toes pointed, all while landing on a balance beam measuring 10 centimeters in width.Fagan said despite trying to better the girls’ routines, they have to remain somewhat conservative to keep the girls healthy and to get them through the season. Watering down routines for now, the girls will build them back up before Championships.“I think the biggest thing is for the team to pull together with all these injuries. At the beginning of the year we set some pretty big goals of winning Big Ten’s and qualifying in NCAA’s,” Fagan said. “But it’s going to take a lot of team chemistry to develop between now and then.”With nine meets left before Big Ten Championships, Fagan took a moment to look ahead to next year. She has big dreams for Best in her final season, like becoming a team captain.“I think she can be a repeat All-American,” Fagan said. “One of the goals I’ve set for her is to be a Big Ten Champion, whether it’s on an event or in the all-around, that’s something we’re working towards.”And what does Best want?“To do better than last year,” she said. “That’s always my goal.” read more

Perfection Ohio State football tops Michigan finishes 120

Ohio State football realized perfection for the sixth time in its 123-year history. The 109th meeting between OSU and Michigan, ranked No. 4 and No. 20, respectively, by the Associated Press for the teams’ 2012 meeting, saw the Buckeyes polish off a 12-0 season under the direction of first-year coach Urban Meyer. OSU defeated UM, 26-21, Saturday at Ohio Stadium. As some expected, the dual-threat quarterbacking combo of Michigan senior Denard Robinson and junior Devin Gardner caused problems for the Buckeyes. Gardner threw for 171 yards, one touchdown and one costly interception on 11-of-20 attempts. Robinson did not attempt a pass in the game, but did lineup under center. He rushed for 122 yards and a touchdown. OSU’s defensive performance, particularly in the second half, was more than the Wolverines could overcome. UM failed to drive into the red zone in the second half and an interception by junior safety C.J. Barnett with less than five minutes to play nearly clinched the win. The Buckeyes defense stifled the UM attack despite missing senior defensive end John Simon, who missed out on Senior Day festivities and the competition with a right knee injury sustained a week ago in a game against Wisconsin.  After the interception, OSU junior running back Carlos Hyde, who ran for 146 yards and a touchdown, took the game over, helping the Buckeyes to two first downs to bleed the fourth-quarter clock out and win The Game. Fans stormed the field. Players rejoiced. Meyer pumped his fists wildly. However unrealistic the expectations of an undefeated season might have seemed when Meyer was hired in late November 2011, he had made good on them. With the win, OSU remains in play for the AP‘s national title crown.  The victory is OSU’s 44th in the history of The Game, though UM, eliminated from Big Ten title contention after Nebraska won on Friday, still owns the all-time series advantage with a 58-44-6 record. The largest Ohio Stadium crowd in the history of the OSU-UM rivalry (105,899) assembled in a bitter chill and light but steady snowfall throughout most of the first half. OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller was 14-of-18 for 189 yards and one touchdown. Buckeyes junior receiver Corey Brown muffed a punt that led to points for UM, but did his best to make up for the uncharacteristic error as he caught eight passes for 95 yards and a touchdown. OSU junior kicker Drew Basil was the high scorer in the contest. Basil, who only attempted six kicks coming into the team’s 12th game, tallied 14 points while connecting four-of-five of his field goal tries from 41, 52, 28 and 25 yards. In addition to help close out the win for OSU, Hyde also helped the Buckeyes jump to an early lead. Hyde blew through the Michigan line 2:19 into the game, scurrying into the end zone on a 3-yard run to put OSU up, 7-0, on the very first possession of the game. The early score was keyed by 52-yard pass reception by sophomore receiver Devin Smith, who broke loose, gathered the deep ball from Miller and joined many of the OSU faithful in attendance in a celebratory bounce. The game’s back-and-forth tenor would be established by Gardner on the next drive when he found senior receiver Roy Roundtree on a 75-yard reception to level the score. Roundtree broke down the east sideline in front of the Wolverines bench and, after slowing his run for a blocker, traipsed into the end zone. The weather seemed to mimic the intensity of the rivalry in that moment as the snow began to fall heavier. Much of the intrigue in The Game centers around the history of the respective programs, and OSU paid homage to its greatest football triumph of the last decade when the 2002 national championship team was honored between the first and second quarters. Former Buckeye coach Jim Tressel, once shamed by the “Tattoo-Gate” scandal that resulted in his forced resignation as OSU coach, was hoisted onto the shoulders of his former players, much to the delight of many in Ohio Stadium. Brown had scored two punt-return touchdowns coming into the team’s final game. His muffed punt early in the second quarter resulted in threatening position for UM on the OSU 25-yard line, and a roughing the passer penalty on OSU redshirt senior defensive lineman Nathan Williams pushed the visitors closer to a score. Gardner eventually capped the drive, scoring on a 2-yard quarterback-keeper run to put the Wolverines in front, 14-10. The lead was the first for UM in Ohio Stadium since the team’s 2006 meeting, which OSU won, 42-39. The teams fought to gain an edge heading into half, and OSU inched its nose in front when Miller found Brown on a 14-yard completion to go back in front at 17-14 with 1:30 to play in the first half. UM retook possession with 90 seconds to play until the break, and retook the lead when Robinson scampered 67 yards into the end zone, gesturing to fans in the south stand after he crossed the goal line. With the wind at his back, Basil uncorked a 52-yard field goal to send OSU into break trailing, 21-20. Basil then opened the scoring in the second half, connecting from 28 yards to put OSU back in front, 23-21. When UM assumed possession, OSU used a Robinson fumble to attempt to assume control of the game. OSU junior safety Christian Bryant gouged the ball from Robinson grasp at the 7:26 mark in the third quarter and Williams recovered the ball on the UM 37-yard line. A pensive Ohio Stadium crowd was lifted for the moment, but the drive ended with Basil’s first field goal miss of the day after the a 3rd-down snap flew over Miller’s head, causing a fumble the quarterback dove to recover. Basil’s were the only points of the third quarter. Instead of scores, OSU and Michigan traded venomous hits, bellying up to the opposition on what seemed like every hit. One such hit, administered to Gardner with less than nine minutes to play, caused a fumble that OSU junior defensive lineman Johnathan Hankins fell gather on the Wolverines’ 10-yard line. The red zone opportunity had potential to put the 2012 edition of The Game on ice, but ended with Basil’s fourth field goal of the game. He hit from 25 yards out to push the Buckeyes’ lead to 26-21. The clincher came just moments later when Barnett intercepted Gardner, leading to the game-clinching drive for OSU. OSU, which posted a 12-0 overall record and an 8-0 mark in the Big Ten, clinched the Big Ten Conference’s outright Leaders’ Division title last weekend at Wisconsin. The Buckeyes will now have to wait until after college football’s bowl season to learn its final positioning in the AP poll. read more

Ohio State womens soccer falls in double overtime to Toledo 10

Then-junior midfielder Ellyn Gruber (5) watches her teammates during a game against Purdue Sept. 29 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 1-0.Credit: Michele Theodore / Managing editor for contentAfter two scoreless periods, the Ohio State women’s soccer team lost in double overtime against the Toledo Rockets, 1-0, Tuesday.“(Toledo’s) style is very disruptive,” OSU coach Lori Walker said. “They were extremely effective tonight in putting us under a lot of pressure, and we made some poor decisions and did not adjust well.”Redshirt-freshman goalkeeper Megan Geldernick had another solid performance, totaling six saves. The only goal allowed during the game was scored in the 105th minute by Toledo junior midfielder Geri Siudzinski.OSU was outshot 19-14 over the course of the game, a category the team trailed in through their first three games of the season as well. Senior forward Kayla Varner said she was disappointed by the team’s lack of offense.“We didn’t come out as hot as we should have,” she said. “We kind of dropped off and let them dictate the pace of the game, which shouldn’t have happened and that was the biggest thing — playing catch-up.”Toledo was the first non-ranked opponent on OSU’s schedule so far this season. Varner said it was still tough playing an unranked team, though.“I think that’s almost more challenging,” Varner said. “You have to get up for the game because you know they’re going to come in and give you hell for it.”The Buckeyes are 1-3-0 for the season. The game marked the team’s third consecutive loss after losing to then-No. 4 North Carolina and in its home opener against then-No. 4 Virginia Tech.Senior midfielder Ellyn Gruber said the team still has work to do.“I think we have a lot of potential for a really good season but we just have to put the pieces together,” Gruber said. “We have to start finishing our chances, but also be really good on defense, like we were the first three games, and put two halves together, and just move on from it.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play Dayton on Friday at 7 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium for the first of two home games this weekend. OSU is set to play George Mason Sunday at 2 p.m. in Columbus. read more